U.S. New York Times News

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https://inltv.co.uk/index.php/war-tax-resistance-resources-national-war-tax-resistance-coordinating-committe

Israel’s war on Gaza live: Demands for mass grave investigation grow

Another Genocidal Act in Gaza By Israel's IDF Military

Al Jazeera Reports 24th April 2024

Over 80 More Palestinians Killed  and

many more injured in Gaza in the last 20 hours 24th April 2024

 Israel's War On Gaza 

 24th April 2024

Latest Gaza Casualty Figures

INTERACTIVE-LIVE-TRACKER-GAZA-APRIL24-2024-1340GMT_1080x1080-1713969677

Israel: At Least 1,139 Killed 8.730 Injured

Palestine-Gaza:  At Least 34.262 Killed 77.2229 Injured

Palestine-West Bank: At Lease 488 Killed 4.800 Injured

Special Sky News Reports Blame For Gaza Genocide Act in Gaza Hospital Lies with the USA, Israel and Britain

INLTV Al Jazeera World And Israel Gaza War News 21st April 2024 Part One

The Streets of New York, The Letter in the Mailbox

https://inltv.co.uk/index.php/war-tax-resistance-resources-national-war-tax-resistance-coordinating-committe

Tax Day protest singers and musicians
Filthy Rotten System and guest singer. Photo by Hideko Otake.
NYPD at tax day demonstration
NYPD was friendly but monitoring the action. Photo by Ed Hedemann.
Some passers-by danced while others objected to our message. Photo by Ed Hedemann.
man with dog on shoulders
This might be the point where Bud sang out, “I’ve had a monkey on my back, but never a dog on my shoulders.” Photo by Hideko Otake.
No Taxes for War protest at IRS, April 2024
The scene. Tax Day 2024, Manhattan IRS. Photo by Ed Hedemann.

One thing about being out in the streets of NYC, it is never dull. Our annual tax day presence at the IRS was a lively affair this year thanks to musical accompaniment of the Raging Grannies and Filthy Rotten System, and an array of passers-by who offered support or challenged our message — some more politely than others.

There was the guy who congratulated us on using our right to peacefully protest and then yelled “Trump 2024” as he rushed off. There were more police than past tax day protests, probably because of the daily Gaza demonstrations but also because that former president was in court about two blocks from where we stood.

A couple women walking by together furiously screamed at us “What about the hostages?” but didn’t stop long enough to listen to our concerns for all lives.

Mike Levinson had more of a chance to engage: “I shared a lively somewhat confrontation conversation with a passerby who seemed disturbed by one of my solo chants, ‘We want our money spent on peace, not for war in the Middle East!’ She challenged me, ‘Why are you only opposed to war in the Middle East, and not opposed to war in the Ukraine?’ I promptly responded, ‘We are opposed to war everywhere, including in the Ukraine. Read the leaflet, Ukraine is mentioned on the back of the flyer with the pie chart. Stick around for the rest of the protest and you will hear us speaking out about all of the areas of military conflict and violence, including right here in America!’ She sort of backed down and agreed to be more open minded.”

A passer-by with a dog on his shoulders was something of a highlight. In fact, it almost seems we were having a bit too much fun given the gravity of the situation in Gaza and the West Bank and the danger of war with Iran. Not to mention Ukraine, starvation in Sudan, and ongoing violence in so many other regions. War Resisters League and New York Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines recently called for protests and lobbying against U.S. military aid to the Philippines, where the army under Marcos Junior is bombing villagers.

Mike Levinson ended the rally with a call to continue our protests against taxes for war all year round, not just on tax day.

The surge in interest in war tax resistance has been heartening, but we know we have a long way to go to turn the policies of this country around. Refusing to pay for war is really  every-day resistance as taxes accompany most employment and the IRS can come calling any time. Here in New York City we plan to offer a series of informal get-togethers to keep answering questions and offering support to new (and ongoing) resisters.

Getting that first letter from the IRS is often a moment when you ask yourself “WHAT HAVE I GOTTEN MYSELF INTO?!” Years ago someone from the IRS said letters are their best form of collection, so I want to encourage new resisters to reach out to the NWTRCC network when that first letter arrives and the fear bubbles up. It’s easy to talk yourself out of carrying on a confrontation with the IRS, but our persistent resistance is a necessary part of the movement for peace, justice, and a better world for all.

— Post by Ruth Benn
NYC War Resisters League

P.S. The NYC protest was co-sponsored by NYC War Resisters League, Catholic Worker, Kairos Community, Pax Christi NYS, Brooklyn For Peace, World Can’t Wait, Veterans for Peace/Chapter 34, Manhattan Peace Action, Move the Money, Peace Action NYS, Peace Action Bay Ridge, NYC Metro Raging Grannies, Extinction Rebellion NYC, and the Granny Peace Brigade.

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Nicholas Nehamas April 18, 2024, Nicholas Nehamas
 Joseph P. Kennedy II said in an interview that his brother Robert F. Kennedy Jr. should end his independent bid for president. “We cannot do anything that in any way strips even one vote from President Biden,” he said, shortly after more than a dozen members of his family endorsed Biden at a campaign event in Philadelphia.
 Adam NagourneyNicholas Nehamas and 

Adam Nagourney reported from Los Angeles, and Nicholas Nehamas and Michael Gold from Philadelphia.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Biden, eyeing the threat from R.F.K. Jr., turns to his famous family for help.

At a campaign rally in Philadelphia, members of the Kennedy family endorsed President Biden, rejecting one of their own, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an independent candidate.CreditCredit...Doug Mills/The New York Times

The elaborate rollout of a Kennedy family endorsement of President Biden on Thursday — talk-show interviews, a campaign event with the president — was the most powerful sign yet of rising concern in the Biden camp that Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s independent White House bid presents a serious threat to the president’s re-election prospects.

Members of this prominent Democratic family, including most of Mr. Kennedy’s siblings, had already signaled their support for Mr. Biden. Mr. Kennedy’s estrangement from much of his family had grown increasingly apparent over the years, as he became a leading spokesman against Covid vaccines and promoted conspiratorial theories about the 1968 assassination of his father, Robert F. Kennedy.

But this was the first time Mr. Biden’s campaign had been so aggressively involved in promoting the Kennedys’ strong backing of the president, making an open push to discredit any enduring Democratic credentials Robert F. Kennedy Jr. carries because of his family name.

After leaving the work to outside liberal groups, the Biden campaign has now joined the effort to define Mr. Kennedy beyond the gauzy memory of his father and two uncles, who for many members of Mr. Biden’s fraying coalition, including Black voters, Latinos and blue-collar workers, continue to symbolize Democratic politics in America.

Democratic worries about Mr. Kennedy have grown as he has turned up his attacks on the president and worked to win ballot lines in critical battleground states. Michigan election officials announced on Thursday that he had secured a spot as a member of a little-known third party.

A photo of Robert F. Kennedy Jr.
Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has grown increasingly estranged from much of his family over the years. His independent presidential bid has been denounced by some of his relatives.Credit...Jim Wilson/The New York Times

“I can only imagine how Donald Trump’s outrageous lies and behavior would horrify my father, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, who proudly served as attorney general of the United States, and honored his pledge to uphold the law and protect the country,” Kerry Kennedy, one of the independent presidential candidate’s siblings, said as she stood next to Mr. Biden, addressing about 150 people at a recreation center gym in Philadelphia. “Daddy stood for equal justice, for human rights and freedom from want and fear. Just as President Biden does today.”

“Nearly every single grandchild of Joe and Rose Kennedy supports Joe Biden,” she said. “That’s right: The Kennedy family endorses Joe Biden for president.”

Responding on social media, Mr. Kennedy avoided engaging with his family’s rejection of his candidacy.

“I hear some of my family will be endorsing President Biden today,” he wrote. “I am pleased they are politically active — it’s a family tradition. We are divided in our opinions but united in our love for each other.”

Mr. Biden, thanking the Kennedy family for its support, spoke repeatedly about how much the Kennedys — in particular John and Robert F. Kennedy — had shaped his views and political career.

“Today I sit behind the Resolute Desk where President John F. Kennedy once sat,” he said. “I sit at that desk and I look in front of the fireplace. To the left is a bust of Martin Luther King. To the right is a bust of your dad.”

In truth, the debate remains open about whether a Kennedy candidacy hurts Mr. Biden more than it hurts former President Donald J. Trump. (One point of agreement between the two major candidates’ camps is that there is little chance Robert F. Kennedy Jr. could win the White House himself.)

Mr. Biden’s advisers argued that Democrats who might be drawn to the Kennedy name will drift away as they learn more about his promotion of conspiracy theories and the financial support that a major Trump donor has given to his super PAC.

Voters have expressed increasing disapproval of Mr. Kennedy, according to 538’s polling average. As Mr. Kennedy has earned more exposure from the news media over the last month, the percentage of Americans with an unfavorable view of him has increased by roughly six percentage points. In Wisconsin, a key battleground, Mr. Kennedy is taking more votes from independents and Republicans than from Democrats, according to an April poll by Marquette Law School.

Still, given the tough re-election fight Mr. Biden faces, his campaign is moving forcefully, and the events on Thursday were the latest example of that.

While the Kennedy family is not what it once was in American politics, fading in relevance for a new generation of voters who may be more familiar with the Clintons than the Kennedys, it is still potentially influential among the kinds of voters in battleground states like Pennsylvania who appear at risk of moving to Mr. Trump.

“There’s a very famous tour that J.F.K. did of smaller western Pennsylvania towns in the ’62 midterms,” said Conor Lamb, a Democratic former congressman from Pennsylvania. “There’s still pictures on the walls in every one of those towns of Kennedy being there and how much he meant to them.”

President John F. Kennedy at a rally in Washington, Pa., in 1962.Credit...Teenie Harris Archive, via Carnegie Museum of Art, via Getty Images

At 70, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. looks very much like his father and his uncles, John and Edward M. Kennedy. In the Kennedy family, he had — before his ideological drift in recent years — been viewed as the most politically gifted of Robert F. Kennedy’s children, with the most potential to embark on his own career in elective politics.

Now, though, a Democratic president’s campaign is seeking to define him as a candidate who, despite his name and legacy, is more politically aligned with Mr. Trump than with the Kennedy whose portrait appears on those walls in western Pennsylvania.

“You put the name Kennedy on the ballot and Democrats are going to feel torn,” Joseph P. Kennedy II said in an interview after the event. “And we are trying to make them understand that this is an issue that they do not have to feel torn about.”

Asked if he would encourage his brother to drop out, he said, “Of course I would.”

Still, if Robert F. Kennedy Jr. stays in the race, Democrats hope that they can ensure his support comes mainly from voters who might otherwise have backed Mr. Trump, at once bolstering Mr. Biden and weakening his Republican rival. Mr. Trump seems wary of this danger, and has stepped up on his attacks on Mr. Kennedy, trying to paint him as part of the “radical left.”

The main super PAC supporting Mr. Trump, MAGA Inc., introduced a website this week pushing those attacks, criticizing Mr. Kennedy over his policies on taxes, gun control and climate change. (The website’s name uses Mr. Kennedy’s initials to call him “radical” and an epithet used to express disdain.)

Still, Mr. Trump has privately spoken with associates about the notion of choosing Mr. Kennedy as his running mate, though it is unclear if he is serious about the idea. When pressed at a campaign stop in Harlem on Tuesday, Mr. Trump described Mr. Kennedy as a “nice guy” and a “good person.” Mr. Kennedy has said he would not accept a spot on a Trump ticket.

After the endorsement event, Joseph P. Kennedy II and Joseph P. Kennedy III, a former Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, met with residents at a lush community garden in a quiet residential neighborhood of Philadelphia that has been gentrifying.

One man tried to give the younger Kennedy two baseball caps for Philly sports teams. “I know you’re never supposed to reject a gift,” Mr. Kennedy joked as he held them.

He then encouraged the roughly dozen people there to volunteer for the Biden campaign, arguing that their help could decide the election.

Joseph P. Kennedy III, speaking to residents of the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia on Thursday.
Joseph P. Kennedy III, right, encouraged residents of the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia on Thursday to volunteer for Mr. Biden’s re-election campaign. Credit...Hannah Beier for The New York Times
 

Hi! I hope all’s well on your end. My name’s Murtaza Nek, I’m a math and science tutor at Henry Ford College in Dearborn, Michigan. I usually file my taxes using online e-filing software, but this time felt the need to communicate a message which wasn’t possible using said software. I’ve thus put in much extra effort to make sure this return was filed as accurately as possible.

I wanted to write to express a nuanced opinion regarding tax collection. First and foremost, I am not opposed to it at all in principle. I appreciate the essential role that collecting funds from a nation plays in helping run the organizational aspects of the nation: ensuring social programs are funded, ensuring there is a social safety net for the less fortunate (as I myself have benefited from), paying for roads and infrastructure, and even for providing international aid and ensuring national defense, when it is needed or warranted.

But to this last point, my lifelong experience as a reasonably well-informed taxpaying American citizen has been that there is a huge gap between what would be considered reasonable use of taxes and federal funds towards international affairs, and how taxes and federal funds are actually used in international affairs. The US uses an inordinate fraction of its federal budget on military spending, about 1/6 of it over the past decade for example, and about half of discretionary spending goes towards the military. The US spends about as much or more on its military than the next 10 countries combined, when listed in order of military spending.

Murtaza Nek (center) at NWTRCC’s May 2023 Conference in Indiana. Photo by Lincoln Rice.

Furthermore, this spending, while seemingly done for the purposes of (a) lining the pockets of military vendors and contractors who lobby Congress aggressively, (b) securing oil, natural gas, and other resources the US seems addicted to, and (c) ensuring economic dominance, e.g. by normalization of the US dollar as a de facto international currency, is not making the US safer in the long run, and I believe is increasingly alienating and isolating the US in the world stage.

What’s worse is that this military dominance is costing countless innocent lives. Examples in US history are abundant, but just one among many things going on now seems particularly egregious. The US government, in “emergency” and without Congressional approval or oversight, is rushing money and munitions, weapons of war, to a nation (Israel) found by the International Court of Justice to be plausibly engaged in acts of genocide.

By estimates found by the Israeli military itself to be reliable, Israel’s indiscriminate bombing and slaughter campaign has killed over 29,000 Palestinians in Gaza since October 7th, and hundreds more in the West Bank. Most of these deaths are of women and children, most of these deaths are of innocent civilians. The Israeli military has even killed their own hostages waving white flags. Israel’s military has repeatedly targeted journalists, healthcare workers, civilians waving white flags, injured hospital patients, and in a particularly egregious incident among far too many to count, assassinated a 5-year-old girl, Hind Rajab, waiting to be rescued by a pair of Palestinian Red Crescent paramedics who communicated and coordinated with the Israeli military their whereabouts and intentions, and who themselves were also assassinated. Of course the Israeli military subsequently claimed to not be aware of that situation, as they are known to lie repeatedly and then sometimes concede the truth after the heat is off them.

Image by Palestinian photographer Hosny Salah in Gaza from Pixabay.

In short, the US has become possibly irrevocably isolated from the rest of the world for supplying a genocidal military with countless billions of dollars in funding for weapons of war (crimes), used indiscriminately to kill innocent children, women and men. Even President Biden himself has been recently reported to have described the Israeli prime minister Netanyahu as being a “bad f***ing guy,” and younger Israeli military members are regularly bragging about their war crimes on TikTok and social media. The vengeance of the Israeli military is unfathomable, and I believe the consequences of their actions are isolating both Israel and the US from the rest of the world.

In an ideal world, I’d be a proud taxpayer. But I cannot be proud of even a penny of my tax dollars going towards rogue nations which are known to be committing war crimes and crimes against humanity. I am thus writing to express opposition to my tax dollars being used for military purposes of any kind. I know this is not in your jurisdiction as an IRS worker, but I needed to write this letter to speak my peace. I feel the world would be a better place if the federal government spent our tax dollars in ways that did not cost the lives of innocents, and prioritized the needs of its own citizens first.

Anyway, I hope this letter had some kind of positive effect, even if just one IRS worker looks at it. I wrap up by reiterating that my 1040 filing is a complete, accurate filing to the best of my knowledge, and there’s nothing frivolous about it, despite this very serious letter. Thank you for reading!

Sincerely, Murtaza Nek

4 thoughts on “My Letter to the IRS”

  1. Kit Millersays:

    Dear Murtaza
    Thank you so much for this letter. My husband and I were just talking about writing ours regarding the money that we are redirecting when this email came in. You’ve inspired us thank you!

  2. Shirley Whitesidesays:

    Thank you for your words and actions Murtaza.

  3. Ruth Castanedasays:

    Dear Murtaza, thank you for sharing with us your letter to the IRS
    English is not my first language, and after reading your letter is not clear to me if you pay your taxes or not.
    Can you please tell me? Me too, I am a good taxpayer but finding out that my taxes are contributing to support the war against Gaza,
    I refuse to pay or al least ask that my taxes go fully to social help.
    Thanks again
    Ruth

  4. paula roggesays:

    Great letter Murtaza! You express just what I am feeling about the war on Gaza by Israel.
    Paula

 

R.F.K. Jr.’s campaign received $2 million from his running mate, Nicole Shanahan.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. smiles next to two American flags.

As Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s independent presidential campaign ran up debts and spent heavily on ballot access, security and consultants, he received a lifeline at the end of March in the form of a $2 million cash infusion from his newly minted running mate, Nicole Shanahan, a new campaign filing shows.

Mr. Kennedy’s campaign reported raising $5.4 million in March, including the money from Ms. Shanahan, which was recorded on March 27 — the day after he announced her as his running mate.

The campaign reported spending $4.5 million in March, an increase from the previous month, and listed $1.6 million in debts, all of which were payments owed to Mr. Kennedy’s security consultant, Gavin de Becker, the filing to the Federal Election Commission shows.

The campaign has paid Mr. de Becker’s firm $2.5 million over the past year.

The campaign ended the month with $6 million on hand, according to the filing.

Under federal law, candidates can inject unlimited money into their own campaigns, and are not subject to the $6,600 individual limits for general-election contributions. Ms. Shanahan, a wealthy Silicon Valley lawyer and investor, was until last year married to the Google co-founder Sergey Brin.

Ms. Shanahan, 38, has already supported Mr. Kennedy’s candidacy with a $4 million contribution to a super PAC backing him — that money went toward a Super Bowl ad that Ms. Shanahan helped conceive of earlier this year.

Among other major expenses in March, the campaign paid $326,000 for “campaign consulting” to Accelevate 2020, a ballot-access and signature-gathering company in Texas.

Getting his presidential ticket on the ballot, particularly in battleground states, is Mr. Kennedy’s most pressing task as he looks to take on both President Biden and former President Donald J. Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, in November.

Gaining ballot access is often expensive and convoluted, and Mr. Kennedy is seeking to do it in all 50 states through a combination of independent petitions and third-party nominations.

Mr. Kennedy on Thursday announced that he had secured a spot on the ballot in the swing state of Michigan, after gaining the nomination of the Natural Law Party, which already had ballot access in the state.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. will be on the general election ballot in Michigan.

Campaign pins of Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

On the same day that more than a dozen members of his family endorsed President Biden, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. announced Thursday that he had secured a spot on the ballot in Michigan, one of the swing states likely to decide the election.

The Natural Law Party, which has ballot access in Michigan, nominated Mr. Kennedy and his running mate, Nicole Shanahan, for president and vice president. A spokeswoman for the Michigan secretary of state’s office confirmed that this meant Mr. Kennedy would be on the ballot in November.

Mr. Kennedy is seeking ballot access in all 50 states through a mixture of independent petitions and third-party nominations. In some states, he has filed to create his own party. At the same time, Democratic allies of Mr. Biden are working to challenge his access to the ballot.

In a statement released by Mr. Kennedy’s campaign, Doug Dern, the chairman of the Natural Law Party, called him “the most qualified candidate in the modern-day history of America.”

Mr. Kennedy, an environmental lawyer known for his antivaccine activism, has spread misinformation about the risks of vaccinations and about other subjects. He also drew attention recently for suggesting that Mr. Biden might pose a greater threat to democracy than former President Donald J. Trump, who tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election, a claim that democracy experts called absurd.

While Mr. Kennedy is generally polling in single digits nationally, Mr. Biden’s campaign is worried that he could draw enough support in battleground states like Michigan to tip a close election to Mr. Trump.

Mr. Kennedy’s relatives are worried about that, too — as evidenced by their show of force for Mr. Biden on Thursday, when a group of them appeared alongside him at a campaign event in Pennsylvania.

 
Tax Day is soon approaching! We would love to know about your plans for tax day.

NWTRCC is hosting an introduction to war tax resistance (WTR 101) session on Saturday March 2nd starting at 1pm Eastern time. Already there are 400 people registered. It is one of the largest registrations that we have had yet for a 101 session. The response on social media has  seen some of the highest engagement with the session being shared over 125 times. Please keep sharing with your networks. It is quite simple and make a big difference!

The increased interest has led us to offer another 101 session on March 14th starting at 2pm Eastern time.  You can find a link to register for the session on March 2nd here and the March 14th session here. We have also assisted local groups in hosting WTR 101 sessions. Portland, Oregon hosting a second introduction ot WTR after the one held in January reached capacity. NWTRCC has a PowerPoint presentation that is available for groups interested in hosting 101 sessions. 

Another gauge of interest in war tax resistance was a record number of participants at the Counselor’s Training. Twenty-four people who had been to a 101 session attended an additional  five hour session to learn more about the various approaches to WTR. It is inspiring to witness so many people seeking out up to date information not only for themselves but to share with their communities. 

With so much information changing year to year with tax filing and the variety of approaches that people take with resisting tax money for militarism, it is a lot to take in for those wanting to assist and support others in navigating this process.

Fortunately, NWTRCC has an extensive website and strong network of people who hold collective knowledge that is certain to answer almost any question. With so many new people committing to not paying taxes this year, NWTRCC wants to ensure that people are prepared as best they can be for potential consequences. 

Refusing To Pay For War

Two War Tax Resistance Campaigns

Tell us how you are preparing for Tax Day. We know that many who engage in WTR redirect money into community needs instead of war. if you have plans for redirection please let us know. In our most recent newsletter, More Than a Paycheck there is a form that requests information about redirection efforts and tax day as well as requests for lit kits to assist in tax day actions.  actions that you can find a link to here.  You can  find the most recent MTAP newsletter here or find more information about Tax Day 2024 on our website here

Also save the date for NWTRCC’s May Conference May 3-5 which will be online. We will share details as they become available. 

Post by Chrissy Kirchhoefer

2 thoughts on “Tax Day 2024- Here we Come!”

  1. Taxes for Peace New England is again looking forward to tabling on Tax Day at the Brattleboro (VT) Food Co-op. That said I continue to wonder as I have for the past eight or so years: Why the focus on April 15th events? It’s never made much sense to me to tell people about tax resistance the day taxes are due, most people have already turned in their taxes. Seems more realistic to tell people about WTR in January/February.

    1. Chrissy Kirchhoefersays: March 1, 2024 

      Lindsey,
      Great points! You definitely are not alone in raising these questions. While tax day has been a time to mobilize actions to raise awareness about how much of our federal income taxes goes towards militarism, NWTRCC continually raises these points year round. Focusing on the needs within our communities and redirecting resources to these needs are practices that people can engage in year round. This year NWTRCC has been hosting regular introductions to war tax resistance since November to assist people pursuing this path and ensuring adequate time to prepare.

 

No, John Mellencamp did not promote President Biden onstage.

John Mellencamp performing in front of a screen displaying multiple colors.

The song opened on cue with a “little ditty about Jack and Diane,” but then the music abruptly stopped. John Mellencamp had barely finished the second verse of his smash hit when an exchange with a heckler had clearly gotten on his nerves.

“You know what?” he told concertgoers last month in Toledo, Ohio. “Show’s over.”

Videos capturing the moment when the singer walked off the stage have ricocheted for weeks online. A cascade of right-wing chatter on social media has fueled the perception that Mr. Mellencamp brought it on himself by promoting President Biden during the show.

But that was not the case.

An audio recording provided to The New York Times by Mr. Mellencamp’s representatives, and an interview with a reporter who covered the March 17 concert for The Blade in Toledo, show that the exchange started when a heckler grew frustrated with the singer’s long-winded reminiscences about his late grandmother. Representatives for Mr. Mellencamp, who returned to the stage and resumed the concert that night several minutes after walking out, declined further comment.

Mr. Mellencamp is an unabashed liberal who has previously barred several Republican presidential candidates from using his songs at political events and has assailed Congress for its response to gun violence. But the exchange with the heckler in Toledo did not stem from any political commentary that happened onstage.

“The word Biden or election never escaped John Mellencamp’s mouth that night,” Jason Webber, who covers music for The Blade, said in an interview.

Mr. Mellencamp, 72, a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, had been sharing an anecdote about how his grandmother, who had lived until the age of 100, had once cautioned him that “you’re not going to get into heaven if you don’t stop this cussing and smoking all the time.”

Not everyone appreciated his storytelling. “Play some music!” one concertgoer shouted, drawing a rebuke from Mr. Mellencamp, who called the man an expletive. The audience began to murmur, with some voicing their disapproval of the man’s interruption and some others sounding impatient, too.

At that point onstage, the singer enlisted help from his security team. “Hey Joe, find this guy and let me see him after the show,” he said, referring to one of his security guards. It was not clear whether some of Mr. Mellencamp’s critics had misinterpreted his reference to the security guard as a reference to the president.

Mr. Mellencamp then suggested that he would cut short his concert because of the heckling.

Scott Walker, a former Wisconsin governor who sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, pounced on the situation online.

“He’s been a jerk for a long time,” Mr. Walker said of Mr. Mellencamp in a post Tuesday on social media.

Mr. Walker linked to a social media post by the Citizen Free Press, a right-wing news aggregation website that had erroneously attributed the heckling and Mr. Mellencamp’s reaction to politics. The site later removed the post from X and acknowledged its mischaracterization.

“CORRECTION,” it wrote in a separate post on X. “The John Cougar Mellencamp video currently going viral has nothing to do with politics or Joe Biden.”

Representatives for Mr. Walker did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Thursday.

Even after the Citizen Free Press posted its correction, right-wing voices have not relented in criticizing Mr. Mellencamp on X, where his name continued to trend this week.

“Dude in the audience is right,” one commenter on X wrote on Tuesday before the correction, combining references to Mr. Mellencamp’s former stage name, John Cougar Mellencamp, and the MSNBC host Rachel Maddow. “They didn’t pay to hear John Cougar Maddow.”

Mr. Webber, the Blade reporter, said he shook his head over the level of misinformation online.

“It’s not like he was up there preaching about politics,” he said.

Mr. Webber said he would be surprised if Mr. Mellencamp had a significant following on the far right in the first place. “A right-wing person going to a John Mellencamp concert would be like a leftist going to see Ted Nugent,” he said.

He estimated that the concert was interrupted for about five minutes before Mr. Mellencamp returned to the stage. But the singer did not pick up where he left off.

“He never did ‘Jack & Diane,’” Mr. Webber said.

 
 
 
 
Since the invasion of Gaza in October 2023, NWTRCC has seen an exponential increase of interest in war tax resistance. Much of this new interest is among younger people who participate in the gig economy. There has been a lot of confusion about the gig economy and third-party reporting, so this post is meant to address these issues.
 

What is a Gig Worker?

Photo by Markus Winkler on Pexels.

A gig worker is someone who is self-employed and solicits paid gigs through online platforms. Selling items on Ebay or driving for Uber would be typical examples. Someone who drives for Uber is not an Uber employee. They sign up to receive driving referrals from Uber. After completing a driving request, the person will payment via Uber, which collected the original payment from the person given a ride. In this instance, Uber simply handles the transaction as a third party.

There could be situations where Uber provides the driver a bonus for meeting some sort of threshold. In this case, the person would still be self-employed, but Uber would no longer be a third-party intermediary since they would be directly paying the person for contracted work. These are two different types of payments that are treated differently for reporting purposes.

1099-K Payments

This difference in work payments may be more easily understood if we examine the two types of tax forms that Uber may send you at year’s end. First, you will probably receive a 1099-K. This form is used when a company acts as a third-party agent for handling money. For Uber, this form would report all the payments from those given rides. Up until tax year 2023, Uber only had to report these payments to you [and the IRS] if the payments you received for goods or services totaled over $20,000 from over 200 transactions. For tax year 2024, this reporting threshold will drop to $5,000. And in 2025, the threshold will drop to $600.

1099-NEC Payments

You may also receive a 1099-NEC tax form from Uber for any income you earned outside of driving, including incentive payments, referral payments, and earning guarantees. This tax form is what traditional self-employed people receive when they are working directly for another company. The reporting threshold for this tax form is $600.

Additional Reasons for Receiving a 1099-K

You may also receive a 1099-K as a traditional self-employed person if you receive credit card payments or payments from third-party processors like PayPal, Venmo, Cash App, etc. For example, if you clean homes and some of the people pay you using a credit card or third party processor, this is 1099-K income. The sole purpose of the 1099-K form is to report third-party financial transactions. The reporting thresholds are the same as listed above for 1099-K income.

There are two notable exceptions to what is reported as 1099-K income. First, if when making a payment to you, the person pays you as “family or friend” and no fee is removed by the third-party processor, these types of payments are not supposed to be reported. The 1099-K is for reporting third-party business transactions, not those between family and friends. Second, Zelle is not subject to 1099-K reporting. The reason Zelle is exempt is because Zelle acts a mechanism for transferring money from one account to another. Zelle never holds the money. In this sense, Zelle is similar to writing a check or a wire transfer. It simply transfers money between accounts without it ever being held in a third-party account.

Tax Day March. Photo by Ed Hedemann.

Gross Income v. Net Income

Lastly, whether someone is a traditional self-employed individual or a gig worker, you are able to deduct expenses from your gross income. Your gross income represents the total amount of money you earned during the year. The earnings reported on all 1099 forms represents gross earnings. As a self-employed person or gig worker, you are responsible for keeping track of allowable expenses. For example, in reporting 1099-K income, Uber and Lyft do not reduce the reported income by the amount they charged you in fees. When filling out your tax forms, you will mark these fees down as a business expense.

 After you have taken all allowable business expenses, you will arrive at your net income. What you will owe in Social Security and Medicare payments, as well as your federal income tax amount are based on your net income.

For more information on war tax resistance as a self-employed person, check out our booklet on the topic, Practical #4: Self-Employment: An Effective Path for War Tax Refusal.

~Post by Lincoln Rice

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. brushes off his relatives’ endorsing Biden.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. standing at a lectern.

Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Responding on Thursday to the news that more than a dozen members of his family would publicly back President Biden, the independent presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. cast the endorsements as an example of civil disagreement and sought to downplay their significance to his campaign against Mr. Biden.

“I am pleased they are politically active — it’s a family tradition,” he wrote on social media. “We are divided in our opinions but united in our love for each other. I hold this as a possibility for America too. Can we disagree without hating our opponents? Can we restore civility and respect to public discourse? I think we can.”

He added that “many” other relatives were “working on and supportive of” his campaign. One relative — Amaryllis Fox Kennedy, his daughter-in-law — is his campaign manager, but a spokeswoman did not respond to a request to identify others who supported him.

Mr. Kennedy, who began his campaign in the Democratic primary last year but decided in the fall to run as an independent instead, is an environmental lawyer better known in recent years for his opposition to vaccines. He has spread misinformation about the risks of childhood vaccinations and Covid-19 shots, as well as on many other subjects. He also drew criticism recently for suggesting that Mr. Biden might pose a greater threat to democracy than former President Donald J. Trump, who tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

Mr. Kennedy is seeking ballot access in all 50 states through a mixture of independent petitions and third-party nominations; in some states, he has filed to create his own party. Mr. Biden’s campaign is highlighting the endorsements, concerned that Mr. Kennedy could draw enough support in swing states like Michigan to tip a close election to Mr. Trump.

 

Biden returns to Pennsylvania, and Trump returns to court in New York.

President Biden in the middle of a group.
Credit...Al Drago for The New York Times

President Biden is in Pennsylvania again today for two campaign events in Philadelphia as he finishes a string of stops in the crucial swing state this week. While Mr. Biden is on the campaign trail, his rival in the presidential race, former President Donald J. Trump, will again be in a New York courthouse for a felony criminal trial, which is resuming after an off day on Wednesday.

In Philadelphia, members of the Kennedy family will endorse Mr. Biden, pointedly snubbing Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the independent presidential candidate whose candidacy has estranged him from much of his storied political family.

The economy and trade have been Mr. Biden’s focus in his recent appearances. On Wednesday, he called for major increases to aluminum and steel tariffs, targeting exports from China.

“They are cheating,” Mr. Biden said, criticizing Chinese steel subsidies as he spoke at the headquarters of the United Steelworkers union in Pittsburgh. “And we’re seeing the damage here in America.”

Mr. Trump, for his part, posted a video Wednesday evening highlighting his maximalist approach to tariffs. He said that if elected, he would pursue “universal base-line tariffs” on all foreign products and additional punitive tariffs on countries that practice currency manipulation. He echoed Mr. Biden in saying that foreign countries’ subsidizing their local industries constituted a form of “cheating.”

In the midweek intermission of his felony criminal trial, Mr. Trump met with Poland’s president, the right-wing politician Andrzej Duda. It was the latest in a series of meetings he has had with foreign heads of state and their emissaries, many of whom share an affinity with Mr. Trump’s politics.

In Arizona on Wednesday, Republican state lawmakers splintered over an effort to repeal the state’s 1864 law that bans nearly all abortion. Republicans in the State House defied Mr. Trump and other top party members who had urged them to scuttle the ban, which many voters see as extreme and archaic.

A planned ballot initiative that would codify abortion rights in the state Constitution could be on the ballot in November, and Republican state lawmakers are considering plans to undermine the measure in an effort to avoid blame and turn attention away from the 1864 ban.

Nicholas Nehamas contributed reporting from Pittsburgh.

 
Under the bright, clear, azure blue skies of Spring, our thoughts turn toward action. There are a number of ways to take action in the upcoming tax season culminating on April 15, 2024 and beyond. NWTRCC has put together a page- Quick Tips for Tax Day that has some resources to activate actions in coming weeks. There is a little something for everyone. We have sample letters to the IRS, the updated Peace Tax Return,  a form for redirection and let us know what you have planned
War tax resisters created this banner for tax marches in 2017.

An article in New York Times this week reminds us of how our “defense” dollars are connected.  It was 21 years ago this week that Rachel Corrie was killed by a Caterpillar D-9 bulldozer while trying to defend a Palestinian home in Rafah.  The bulldozer was made specifically for the Israeli military to destroy homes. This week Caterpillar was in the news for not paying taxes. The article reported on the investigation of the IRS into Caterpillar for not reporting over $3 Billion in profits by moving accounts overseas. The article alludes to political appointments as the reason that Caterpillar was not fined or held to account for their failure to pay taxes corporations but corporations have long avoided paying taxes as well as presidents.  

On the anniversary of her death, people traveled to Caterpillar headquarters including Rachel’s parents to try to hold the company responsible for the harm their product had inflihcted. Her father explained that as a business man he wanted to hold the company to their code of ethics. The demand then and the demand now is that these companies must be held accountable for the destruction and loss of life these products cause. 

Looking back in time, A year ago NWTRCC published The Bottom Line about the many unique aspects of US taxpayer money and the Israeli military. The article cites that through 2020, the US has given $236 Billion in aid to Israel and continues

“Many aspects distinguish the United State’s support of Israel. One is the fact that Israel receives a lump sum of allocated MOU money in the first month of the budgetary year in which it can be deposited in an interest bearing account with the  Federal Reserve which increases the money available to the Israeli military. This allows for more money to be invested in the Israeli military than is currently acknowledged and able to be tracked.”

Much of the background was from a video from the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) a Quaker organization. You can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxOLXaKgIxA

https://youtu.be/AxOLXaKgIxA

Another note in history was the formation of the War Resisters’ International on March 16, 1921. They wrote a statement that began and ended with these words: “War is a crime against humanity…WE, THEREFORE, actuated by an intense love for mankind…We hold, however, that consistent pacifists have no right to take up a merely negative positions, but must recognise AND STRIVE FOR THE REMOVAL OF ALL CAUSES OF WAR.

Weeds grow through cracksPhoto

Photo by Ed Hedemann, 2017.

 

We are educating ourselves and each other. 

We must keep trying to use all of the tools at our disposal with love and learning as keys. Share the wealth of NWTRCC resources with those interested in refusing to pay for war. We have videos and lots of other materials. 

On the topic of education and videos, I’d recommend Exterminate All the Brutes. The miniseries was directed by Raoul Peck who was the former Minister of Culture of Haiti.  It provides an overview of European colonization and would be worth a  watch over the weekend or Spring Break.

Post by Chrissy Kirchhoefer

 

Elections have gotten more accessible for disabled voters, but gaps remain.

Two white signs with the blue and white International Symbol of Access and red arrows that say “vote” are positioned on concrete.

In 2018, Kenia Flores, who is blind, voted by mail in North Carolina because she was attending college out of state. Had she been able to vote in person, she could have used an accessible machine. But voting absentee, her only option was to tell another person her choices and have them fill out her ballot. She had no way to verify what they did.

Dessa Cosma, who uses a wheelchair, arrived at her precinct in Michigan that year to find that all the voting booths were standing height. A poll worker suggested she complete her ballot on the check-in table and got annoyed when Ms. Cosma said she had a right to complete it privately. Another worker intervened and found a private space.

That night, Ms. Cosma — the executive director of Detroit Disability Power, where Ms. Flores is a voting access and election protection fellow — vented to the group’s advisory committee and discovered that “every one of them had a story about lack of ability to vote easily, and we all had different disabilities,” she said. “It made me realize, ‘Oh wow, even more than I realized, this is a significant problem.’”

It has been for decades. A series of laws — including the Help America Vote Act in 2002, or HAVA, which created new standards for election administration and grant programs for states to maintain those standards — have sought to make it easier. And they have, but major gaps remain.

That is illustrated in a new report to the federal Election Assistance Commission, released Thursday by six researchers from Rutgers University and one from San Diego State University.

The report looked at elections through the 20th anniversary of HAVA in 2022 and found that the law had generally improved accessibility. The shift was reflected both quantitatively (in turnout and the percentage of people reporting trouble voting) and qualitatively (in voters’ responses in focus groups).

But while the gap has shrunk, disabled Americans still vote at much lower rates than Americans who aren’t disabled.

In 2000, the last pre-HAVA election, turnout for people with disabilities was nearly 17 percentage points lower than the rate for people without disabilities. By 2020 — the most recent election that is directly comparable, since presidential and midterm years have different characteristics — that had narrowed to about 11 points.

The gap has always been smaller in midterms, whose electorates tend to consist of fewer and more dedicated voters. In 2022, it was 4.6 points, which was lower than the last midterm before HAVA (5.7 points in 1998) but not the narrowest result over the full period (4 points in 2014).

A separate measure — what percentage of people reported difficulty voting, even if they managed it — showed significant progress over the past 10 years.

In 2012, more than a quarter of people with disabilities, 26 percent, reported having trouble — far higher than the roughly 7 percent of people without disabilities who did. In 2022, 14 percent of disabled people reported trouble, compared with 4 percent of nondisabled people.

But the data showed backsliding recently: The 14 percent in 2022 was up from about 11 percent in 2020.

The lead researchers — Douglas Kruse and Lisa Schur, co-directors of the Rutgers Program for Disability Research and professors at the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations — said they could not say for sure why that happened. But they said the increase might reflect the revocation of pandemic policies that had made it easier to vote by mail, or an increase in people newly disabled by long Covid.

Dr. Kruse said a particularly revealing finding was that, from 2018 to 2022, turnout increased among people with disabilities even as it decreased overall. (The overall decrease was not surprising, as 2018 was an unusually high-turnout midterm election.) And the increase among disabled voters came almost entirely in states that made it easier to vote by mail during the pandemic.

“It’s a very striking indication that — surprise, surprise — making it easier to vote makes a big difference,” Dr. Kruse said.

Over the past three years, many Republican-led states have enacted new restrictions — including shortening early-voting periods, reducing the number of ballot drop boxes and limiting who can help voters return absentee ballots — that disability rights advocates have argued disproportionately affect disabled people.

Dr. Schur and Dr. Kruse emphasized that the research did not provide enough data to isolate the effects of specific restrictions.

But “even if they have a small impact, it’s a cumulative effect that people have multiple barriers to voting,” Dr. Schur said. “It’s transportation, it’s the time they have to vote early, it’s the time they have to do a mail-in ballot — each restriction just adds to the burden.”

While the greater accessibility of mail-in voting appears to have made a difference in the last two elections, the progress in the first years after HAVA appears to have been driven by better accessibility at polling places, including wheelchair access and accessible voting machines that can read ballots out loud and mark them.

But many voters reported in the focus groups that poll workers didn’t know how the machines worked.

Two years after her bad experience completing a ballot from her wheelchair, Ms. Cosma tried an accessible machine. It gave an error message, which the workers had to call for help to resolve. When they got it working, she completed and printed her ballot — only to find that the tabulator wouldn’t accept it because the paper was a different size from the paper used in the other voting machines.

“I eventually had to leave without seeing my ballot get put in the tabulator,” she said. “I do this kind of work professionally, I know how to advocate for myself, I know the rules, and I still left without my ballot being counted in front of me.”

Benjamin Hovland, the chairman of the Election Assistance Commission, said the remaining turnout gap could be tougher to close.

“A lot of work from election officials has gone into shrinking that gap, but if we want to think about how we make the next 5 percent, that’s going to require doubling down efforts,” Mr. Hovland said. “Some of this was undoubtedly lower-hanging fruit.”

He said the commission’s focuses included increasing training for election workers and promoting a wider range of voting options — with the understanding that mail-in voting might be the best option for many people with disabilities but the worst for others.

The researchers offered seven recommendations to the Election Assistance Commission and to local officials.

Among them were more extensively publicizing voting options and accommodations, which many focus group participants were unaware of, and having people with disabilities test polling locations in advance to identify problems.

Still, there are concrete signs of change.

Ms. Flores, who had to have someone else complete her absentee ballot in 2018, would not have had to do that today. After a court order in 2021, North Carolina lets disabled voters complete absentee ballots electronically.

New York Times Coverage of the 2024 Election


Presidential Race


Read More

    1.  
      TIMESVIDEO

      Columbia University Arrests Student Pro-Palestinian Protesters

      The police arrested more than 100 students demonstrators at a tent encampment set up on the campus of Columbia University in New York City.

      By REUTERS and STORYFUL

      April 19, 2024
    2. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      How a New Reparations Effort Changed an Expert’s Understanding of History

      Don Tamaki was integral to getting redress for Japanese Americans. He says serving on a California task force transformed his view on racism in America.

      By AMY QIN

      April 19, 2024
    3. At Columbia, the Protests Continued, With Dancing and Pizza

      Will more stringent tactics subdue protests? Or fuel them?

      By VIMAL PATEL, CHELSIA ROSE MARCIUS and KARLA MARIE SANFORD

      April 19, 2024
    4. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Trump on Trial vs. Biden on the Trail: An Unusual 2024 Stretch Begins

      President Biden’s push to transform the race into a binary choice between him and Donald Trump has been aided by blanket coverage of Mr. Trump’s courtroom appearances.

      By LISA LERER, NICHOLAS NEHAMAS and MICHAEL GOLD

      April 19, 2024
    5. Fake Tags Add to Real Chaos on American Roads

      Officials are moving to increase enforcement and change laws in response to the rise in counterfeit or expired plates, which exploded during the pandemic.

      By MICHAEL CORKERY

      April 19, 2024
    6. Biden Administration Releases Revised Title IX Rules

      The new regulations extended legal protections to L.G.B.T.Q. students and rolled back several policies set under the Trump administration.

      By ZACH MONTAGUE and ERICA L. GREEN

      April 19, 2024
    7. Johnson Turns to Democrats to Bring Up Ukraine Aid Bill in the House

      Democrats, who stepped in late Thursday to save a resolution paving the way for the foreign aid package to be considered, will have to do so again on Friday in a critical vote on the House floor.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 18, 2024
    8. No Bias Found in F.B.I. Report on Catholic Extremists

      Republicans claimed the bureau’s memo was evidence of an anti-conservative strain among F.B.I. ranks, but an internal investigation failed to uncover any “malicious intent.”

      By GLENN THRUSH and ADAM GOLDMAN

      April 18, 2024
    9. Judge in Documents Case Rejects Dismissal Motions by Trump Co-Defendants

      Judge Aileen M. Cannon denied requests by Walt Nauta and Carlos De Oliveira to have the charges against them dropped.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 18, 2024
    10. Major Delays at Sacramento Airport After AT&T Cable Is Slashed

      The authorities said the cable had been cut intentionally, halting check-in services for at least two major airlines for several hours.

      By LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA

      April 18, 2024
 
    1. Ex-St. Louis Police Officer Beaten by Then-Colleagues Is Awarded $23 Million

      Luther Hall won the judgment against a former colleague in connection with a beating that took place during a 2017 protest where he was undercover.

      By EMILY SCHMALL

      April 18, 2024
    2. TRUMP ON TRIAL

      ‘We Have Our Jury’

      After a rocky morning in which two jurors were dismissed, a full panel of 12 was seated. Opening statements could start Monday.

      By JESSE MCKINLEY

      April 18, 2024
    3. Here’s How Johnson’s Jigsaw Puzzle of a Foreign Aid Plan Would Work

      The speaker, facing resistance from fellow Republicans, has devised a strategy for steering aid to Ukraine and Israel through the House. The key vote will take place before any of it hits the floor.

      By ROBERT JIMISON

      April 18, 2024
    4. Judge Rejects Trump’s Effort to Delay Jan. 6 Civil Cases

      The former president had sought to have lawsuits against him put on hold until after his federal criminal trial on charges of plotting to overturn the 2020 election.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 18, 2024
    5. TIMESVIDEO

      Kennedy Family Endorses President Biden

      At a campaign rally in Philadelphia, members of the Kennedy family endorsed President Biden, rejecting one of their own, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., an independent candidate.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 18, 2024
    6. Johnson Has a Tough Job. McCarthy’s Concessions Are Making It Tougher.

      The Republican speaker’s problems spring from his predecessor’s efforts to placate the far right as he grasped for the gavel. Now they are seeking to use the leverage they won then to get their way on the foreign aid bill.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 18, 2024
    7. U.S. Restarts Deportation Flights to Haiti

      The Biden administration had paused deportations of Haitian migrants in recent months as their home country was wracked by violence.

      By HAMED ALEAZIZ

      April 18, 2024
    8. Heat-Related E.R. Visits Rose in 2023, C.D.C. Study Finds

      As record heat enveloped the nation, the rate of emergency room visits increased compared with the previous five years, a sign of the major health risks of high temperatures.

      By NOAH WEILAND

      April 18, 2024
    9. No, John Mellencamp Did Not Promote Biden Onstage

      Hecklers disrupted a concert in Ohio — and online critics pounced to say, falsely, that it started because the liberal singer had expressed support for the president.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 18, 2024
    10. R.F.K. Jr. Received $2 Million From His Running Mate, Nicole Shanahan

      The infusion of cash into his presidential campaign came a day after he announced Ms. Shanahan, a wealthy Silicon Valley lawyer, as his No. 2.

      By REBECCA DAVIS O’BRIEN

      April 18, 2024
 
    1. Colleges Warn Student Demonstrators: Enough

      After years of tolerating unruly protests, some schools are starting to suspend and expel students, raising questions about where they should draw the line.

      By JEREMY W. PETERS

      April 18, 2024
    2. Fake Priest Who Targeted Churches Across U.S. Is Arrested, Sheriff Says

      Law enforcement agencies had been on the lookout for a serial burglar who was posing as a priest and called himself Father Martin, the sheriff’s office in Riverside, Calif., said.

      By JOHNNY DIAZ

      April 18, 2024
    3. Biden Seeking to Appeal to Key Constituencies With Targeted Policies

      The president’s campaign has featured initiatives aimed at young people, union workers and environmentalists, but it is not clear that they will be sufficient to rekindle support in those groups.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 18, 2024
    4. Surveillance Bill Clears Key Hurdle in Senate Ahead of Friday Expiration

      Republicans and Democrats voted to advance a measure to extend a warrantless surveillance law, but skeptics in both parties were still pushing to make substantial changes before a final vote.

      By LUKE BROADWATER

      April 18, 2024
    5. Chinese Exports Are Threatening Biden’s Industrial Agenda

      The president is increasingly hitting back with tariffs and other measures meant to restrict imports, raising tensions with Beijing.

      By JIM TANKERSLEY and ALAN RAPPEPORT

      April 18, 2024
    6. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Anaheim Approves Biggest Redesign of Disneyland in 30 Years

      Disney plans to spend at least $1.9 billion to develop and reimagine the park over the next decade.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 18, 2024
    7. CONGRESSIONAL MEMO

      The Latest Impeachment Is History, but the Political Repercussions Will Live On

      Republicans say the quick dismissal of charges against Alejandro Mayorkas sets a dangerous precedent. Democrats say the mistake would have been to treat the case seriously.

      By CARL HULSE

      April 18, 2024
    8. TIMESVIDEO

      The Question of Fairness in the Trump Trial

      In a historic case against a polarizing former president, jury selection in Donald J. Trump’s Manhattan criminal trial has so far focused on whether anyone can judge him fairly.

      By JOHN PAPPAS, MARK BOYER, GABRIEL BLANCO and MAGGIE HABERMAN

      April 18, 2024
    9. What Happens if a Powerful Surveillance Law Expires This Week?

      Senators are under pressure to reject amendments to a House-passed bill so it can become law before a statute expires Friday night. But the program would continue after any such lapse — with some caveats.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE

      April 18, 2024
    10. Elections Have Gotten More Accessible for Disabled Voters, but Gaps Remain

      A report to the Election Assistance Commission from researchers at Rutgers University found that disabled voters’ turnout lagged non-disabled voters’ by 11 percentage points, down from 17.

      By MAGGIE ASTOR

      April 18, 2024
 
    1. Sick of Your Blue State? These Real Estate Agents Have Just the Place for You.

      Agents in South Carolina, the fastest growing state in the country last year, say that many newcomers are Republicans eager to leave the Northeast and West Coast.

      By EDUARDO MEDINA

      April 18, 2024
    2. War in Gaza Causes Surprising Rift Within Japanese American Group

      Activists in the Asian American community are pressuring organizations to re-evaluate their partnerships and to call for a cease-fire.

      By AMY QIN

      April 18, 2024
    3. Widespread 911 Outages Are Reported in Four States

      Residents in parts of South Dakota, Nebraska, Texas and Nevada were unable to call the emergency number, officials said. Service was later restored in Las Vegas, Nebraska and South Dakota.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 17, 2024
    4. School Board Cancels Gay Actor’s Anti-Bullying Talk Over His ‘Lifestyle’

      Maulik Pancholy was scheduled to give a talk on anti-bullying at a Pennsylvania school next month. School board members scrapped it, citing concerns about his activism and “lifestyle.”

      By ORLANDO MAYORQUÍN

      April 17, 2024
    5. Justice Dept. Nears Settlement Over F.B.I.’s Failure to Investigate Larry Nassar

      The deal, which could be announced in coming weeks, would bring an end to one of the last major cases stemming from a horrific sports scandal.

      By JULIET MACUR and GLENN THRUSH

      April 17, 2024
    6. Trump Demands a Cut of Donations From Campaigns That Use His Name

      The Trump campaign said that candidates using his brand should turn over at least 5 percent of donations and encouraged them to send more than the minimum.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 17, 2024
    7. Guantánamo Bay Opens an Extra Courtroom

      Planners added the national security courtroom for pretrial hearings and to prepare for the possibility of a Sept. 11 trial.

      By CAROL ROSENBERG

      April 17, 2024
    8. Barbara Joans, Anthropologist Who Studied Biker Culture, Dies at 89

      In her 60s, she hit the open road on a hulking Harley-Davidson and found a new area of academic research: bikers, and in particular, women bikers.

      By ALEX WILLIAMS

      April 17, 2024
    9. Is Trump’s Trial Really About ‘Hush Money’?

      Both the prosecutors and defense are trying to frame it differently.

      By JESS BIDGOOD

      April 17, 2024
    10. N.R.A. to Overhaul Charity It’s Accused of Using as a ‘Piggy Bank’

      The gun group settled with the District of Columbia’s attorney general, who said it had misused tax-deductible donations. The N.R.A. denies all wrongdoing in the case.

      By DANNY HAKIM

      April 17, 2024
 
    1. China Could Threaten Critical Infrastructure in a Conflict, N.S.A. Chief Says

      Gen. Timothy Haugh, who is also the head of the U.S. military’s Cyber Command, said Beijing was “sending a pretty clear signal.”

      By JULIAN E. BARNES

      April 17, 2024
    2. Senate Dismisses Impeachment Charges Against Mayorkas Without a Trial

      Democrats quickly swept aside the articles of impeachment accusing the homeland security secretary of refusing to enforce immigration laws and breach of public trust, calling them unconstitutional.

      By LUKE BROADWATER

      April 17, 2024
    3. Biden, Competing With Trump to Be Tough on China, Calls for Steel Tariffs

      Speaking to the United Steelworkers union in Pittsburgh, the president urged major increases to some tariffs on steel and aluminum products from China.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS and JIM TANKERSLEY

      April 17, 2024
    4. Biden Weighs in on Caitlin Clark Salary Debate After W.N.B.A. Draft

      President Biden’s remarks on the issue came shortly after Caitlin Clark, the University of Iowa basketball star, was selected first in the W.N.B.A. draft.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 17, 2024
    5. ‘Bone Valley’ Podcast Subject Is Granted Parole 37 Years After Wife’s Murder

      Leo Schofield has maintained innocence all along in his wife’s murder in 1987, and another man has since confessed to the killing.

      By REMY TUMIN

      April 17, 2024
    6. Boeing Whistle-Blower Details His Concerns to Congressional Panel

      Sam Salehpour, an engineer at Boeing for over a decade, testified that the company introduced production shortcuts in an attempt to address bottlenecks.

      By MARK WALKER

      April 17, 2024
    7. Supreme Court Backs Police Officer in Job Bias Case

      The officer, Jatonya Muldrow, said she had been transferred to a less desirable position based on her sex. Lower courts ruled that she had failed to show concrete harm.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 17, 2024
    8. Johnson Pushes Ahead on Foreign Aid Bill, Teeing Up a Weekend Vote

      The embattled Republican speaker said he expected Saturday votes on the long-stalled package of aid to Ukraine, Israel and other U.S. allies, as well as fresh sanctions on Iran.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 17, 2024
    9. Read Nemat Shafik’s Opening Remarks

      In her prepared opening statement, Nemat Shafik, the president of Columbia University, laid out ways the university has been responding to antisemitism on campus.

       
      April 17, 2024
    10. Read Virginia Foxx’s Opening Remarks

      Representative Virginia Foxx, who chairs the House Education and the Workforce Committee, listed the reasons for calling Wednesday’s hearing on campus antisemitism in her prepared opening remarks.

       
      April 17, 2024
 
    1. Woman Admits Killing Pregnant Teenager for Her Baby

      Clarisa Figueroa, 51, of Chicago, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 50 years in prison. Prosecutors say she strangled the young mother and tried to pass the baby off as her own.

      By ORLANDO MAYORQUÍN

      April 17, 2024
    2. Biden, in Pennsylvania, speaks to the United Steelworkers.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 17, 2024
    3. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Californians Share Their Pandemic Silver Linings, Four Years After Lockdowns

      Readers submitted small ways that the pandemic shifted their thinking for the better, or introduced a new joy into their life.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 17, 2024
    4. Biden to Run Ads Across Pennsylvania Attacking Trump on the Economy

      Winning the state, where he narrowly defeated Donald J. Trump in 2020, is crucial to his re-election strategy.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 17, 2024
    5. Prosecutions of Fake Electors for Trump Gain Ground in Swing States

      Georgia, Michigan and Nevada have already brought charges against people who posed as electors for Donald Trump, and Arizona and Wisconsin have active investigations.

      By DANNY HAKIM

      April 17, 2024
    6. Women Talk Through Their Abortions on TikTok

      At a time of heightened confusion and legal battles over access to abortion, women are looking to social media for answers.

      By EMILY SCHMALL

      April 17, 2024
    7. As Lahaina Burned, Fire Crews Waited an Hour for Equipment

      A new analysis of the August inferno on the island of Maui in Hawaii describes heroic efforts by firefighters. But it also finds many ways the town could have been better prepared.

      By MIKE BAKER

      April 17, 2024
    8. Arizona Republicans Splinter Over Repeal of 1864 Abortion Ban

      The State Senate introduced a bill to repeal a near-total abortion ban dating back to the Civil War, while the House blocked an effort to do so.

      By ELIZABETH DIAS and KELLEN BROWNING

      April 17, 2024
    9. Biden to Call for Tripling Tariffs on Chinese Steel Products

      In a speech to union steelworkers in Pittsburgh, the president will announce several new measures meant to raise new barriers against floods of Chinese imports.

      By JIM TANKERSLEY and NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 17, 2024
    10. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Johnson Needs Democrats on Ukraine, Handing Them Power to Shape Aid Plan

      The Republican speaker’s elaborate strategy for passing a foreign aid package over his party’s objections will require the cooperation of Democrats to push it through — and possibly save his job.

      By ANNIE KARNI

      April 17, 2024
 
    1. Blinken Arrives in Italy for Talks on Israel and Ukraine at G7 Meeting

      The U.S. secretary of state and his counterparts are gathering as world leaders try to contain the fallout from the Israel-Hamas war.

      By MICHAEL CROWLEY

      April 17, 2024
    2. TIMESVIDEO

      Debunking Trump’s Misleading and False Claims About His Court Cases

      Linda Qiu, a fact check reporter for The New York Times, analyzes some of Donald Trump’s false and misleading statements about his ongoing court cases.

      By LINDA QIU, CLAIRE HOGAN, JAMES SURDAM and NOAH THROOP

      April 17, 2024
    3. What to Know About the Turmoil at Colleges Over the Israel-Hamas War

      On campus, the debate over free speech and antisemitism has only become more charged.

      By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS and COLBI EDMONDS

      April 17, 2024
    4. Fact-Checking Trump’s Defenses in His Court Cases

      The former president has trotted out a host of false and misleading claims to defend his conduct, attack judges and prosecutors and portray himself as a victim of political persecution.

      By LINDA QIU

      April 17, 2024
    5. Inside the Late-Night Parties Where Hawaii Politicians Raked In Money

      After the state passed a law barring government contractors from donating to politicians, fund-raising parties showed just how completely the reform effort failed.

      By BLAZE LOVELL, ERIC SAGARA and IRENE CASADO SANCHEZ

      April 17, 2024
    6. Heavy Rain and Floods Kill 19 in Oman and Disrupt Dubai Airport

      A year’s worth of rain fell in one day in some areas across Oman and the United Arab Emirates, bringing cities to a standstill.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 17, 2024
    7. Bob Graham, Former Florida Governor and Senator, Dies at 87

      After the 9/11 attacks, Mr. Graham became an outspoken critic of President George W. Bush’s response and voted against invading Iraq.

      By ROBERT D. MCFADDEN

      April 16, 2024
    8. Alabama Runoff Elections Set Field in Newly Competitive House District

      Shomari Figures, a Democrat who worked in the Justice Department, and Caroleene Dobson, a Republican newcomer, advanced in the state’s Second Congressional District.

      By EMILY COCHRANE

      April 16, 2024
    9. Michigan Democrats Reclaim Full Control of Statehouse With Special Election Wins

      The departure of two Democratic representatives who won suburban mayoral posts last fall evenly split the Michigan House.

      By MITCH SMITH

      April 16, 2024
    10. Defendant Trump Heads to Harlem to Rail Against Crime, and Alvin Bragg

      After a day in court, Donald Trump visited a bodega in Harlem where a clerk stabbed a man in 2022 and was charged by Alvin Bragg, who also leveled felony charges against the former president.

      By MICHAEL GOLD

      April 16, 2024
 
    1. Kari Lake Urges Supporters to Arm Themselves Ahead of Election

      “We are going to put on the armor of God,” the Arizona Republican candidate for Senate said to cheering supporters. “And maybe strap on a Glock on the side of us just in case.”

      By CHRIS CAMERON and KELLEN BROWNING

      April 16, 2024
    2. Buttigieg Teams Up With State Attorneys General to Investigate Airline Complaints

      Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced a new partnership with more than a dozen state attorneys general that aims to improve protections for air travelers.

      By MARK WALKER

      April 16, 2024
    3. Man Sentenced to 35 Years in Prison for Kidnapping F.B.I. Worker

      Juan Alvarez-Sorto and two other people were on a drug trafficking trip in 2022 when they carjacked an S.U.V. belonging to a crime victim specialist, federal prosecutors said.

      By JESUS JIMÉNEZ

      April 16, 2024
    4. Trump Holds Series of Meetings With Foreign Leaders

      The former president has had several private interactions with foreign heads of state and their emissaries. He plans to meet Wednesday with Poland’s president.

      By JONATHAN SWAN, MAGGIE HABERMAN and MICHAEL CROWLEY

      April 16, 2024
    5. TIMESVIDEO

      Biden Digs at Trump During His Pennsylvania Hometown Visit

      In a speech about his tax plan, President Biden compared Scranton, Pa., to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago to highlight the different economic and social values between America’s middle class and its wealthy.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 16, 2024
    6. Johnson’s Plan for Ukraine Aid Meets Republican Pushback, Muddying Its Path

      The Republican speaker’s strategy for moving foreign aid measures for Israel and Ukraine through the House has outraged many in his own party, increasing calls for his ouster.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 16, 2024
    7. Biden Bashes Trump as a Pawn of Billionaires as He Lays Out His Tax Plan

      Speaking in Scranton, Pa., his hometown, the president used a speech about economic fairness as a new avenue of attack against his Republican rival, who was in a courtroom two hours away.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 16, 2024
    8. Americans Are More Vulnerable to Foreign Propaganda, Senator Warns

      Senator Mark Warner, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, said the United States was more susceptible to Russian influence operations than it was during the 2020 elections.

      By JULIAN E. BARNES

      April 16, 2024
    9. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Trump’s Jan. 6 Case Could Go On Even if Court Limits Use of Obstruction Law

      The federal indictment of Donald Trump for plotting to overturn the 2020 election relies in part on the law that the Supreme Court weighed on Tuesday, but was built to survive without it.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 16, 2024
    10. 4 in ‘God’s Misfits’ Group Charged in Disappearance of 2 Kansas Women

      The four arrested on murder and kidnapping charges were from Oklahoma and, according to a relative, were members of an anti-government group by that name, the authorities said.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      April 16, 2024
 
    1. A Wealthy Democratic Representative Is Among Top Self-Funders in Senate Primary History

      Representative David Trone of Maryland was spending millions from his personal fortune even before his recent use of a racial slur drew criticism.

      By JAZMINE ULLOA

      April 16, 2024
    2. House Delivers Impeachment Articles Against Mayorkas, Calling for a Trial

      Republicans are demanding a full trial of the homeland security secretary, but Democrats have made it clear they will try to dismiss the charges quickly and with little fanfare.

      By LUKE BROADWATER

      April 16, 2024
    3. California Man Gets 9 Years in Firebombing of Planned Parenthood Clinic

      The clinic, which provided abortion, birth control and other health services in Costa Mesa, Calif., was the target of a “brazen attack” in 2022, a prosecutor said.

      By CHRISTINE HAUSER

      April 16, 2024
    4. U.S.C. Cancels Valedictorian’s Speech After Pro-Israel Groups Object

      The university cited security concerns at the graduation. But the student, who is Muslim, said the school was “succumbing to a campaign of hate meant to silence my voice.”

      By STEPHANIE SAUL

      April 16, 2024
    5. Cotton Urges Citizens to Forcibly Confront Pro-Palestinian Protesters

      The Republican senator from Arkansas said citizens should “take matters into your own hands” against demonstrators who have stepped up their civil disobedience to protest Israel’s offensive in Gaza.

      By ROBERT JIMISON

      April 16, 2024
    6. Melania Trump Avoids the Courtroom, but Is Said to Share Her Husband’s Anger

      Melania Trump has long referred to the hush-money case involving Stormy Daniels as her husband’s problem, not hers. But she has privately called the trial a “disgrace” that could threaten his campaign.

      By KATIE ROGERS

      April 16, 2024
    7. Capitol Attack Prosecutions Have Ensnared Over 1,380 People

      Prosecutors have suggested that a total of 2,000 or 2,500 people could ultimately face indictment for their roles in the attack.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 16, 2024
    8. Secret Rift Over Data Center Fueled Push to Expand Reach of Surveillance Program

      Privacy advocates are raising alarms about a mysterious provision the House added to a surveillance bill last week. The Senate is likely to vote on the bill later this week.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE

      April 16, 2024
    9. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Why Is California Called California?

      Probably because of a griffin-riding warrior queen.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 16, 2024
    10. U.S. Limits Deadly Mining Dust as Black Lung Resurges

      Federal regulation capping toxic airborne silica has been decades in the making. The delay has cost miners dearly.

      By CHRIS HAMBY

      April 16, 2024
 
    1. Supreme Court Appears Skeptical of Using Obstruction Law to Charge Jan. 6 Rioters

      The justices considered the gravity of the assault and whether prosecutors have been stretching the law to reach members of the mob responsible for the attack.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 16, 2024
    2. In Pennsylvania, Biden slams Trump as he calls for a fairer tax code.

      In Scranton, his hometown, the president discussed tax policy in terms of economic fairness, arguing that Donald Trump’s tax cuts benefited billionaires.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 16, 2024
    3. 5 Takeaways From a Year of Medicaid Upheaval

      In the year after a pandemic-era policy preserving Medicaid coverage lapsed, more than 20 million people were dropped from the program at some point.

      By NOAH WEILAND

      April 16, 2024
    4. The House Republican Going After Universities on Antisemitism

      Representative Virginia Foxx is a blunt partisan. But her life in rural North Carolina informs her attacks against these schools, starting with whether Harvard is truly “elite.”

      By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS

      April 16, 2024
    5. Supreme Court’s Review of Jan. 6 Charge Has Already Freed Some Rioters

      Federal judges have agreed to release about 10 defendants who were serving prison terms because of their convictions under an obstruction law.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 16, 2024
    6. NEWS ANALYSIS

      A Diplomatic Victory of Uncertain Staying Power

      President Biden successfully assembled a coalition to defend Israel against Iran’s aerial attack, but the cycle of retaliation could continue, challenging the White House’s efforts to avert a sustained conflict.

      By PETER BAKER

      April 16, 2024
    7. Trump, Trailing Biden in Cash, Relies on Big Donors to Try to Catch Up

      Major Republican donors have begun to open their checkbooks for Donald Trump now that he is the presumptive nominee, as he struggles to keep pace with President Biden.

      By REBECCA DAVIS O’BRIEN

      April 15, 2024
    8. Under Pressure From Trump, Arizona Republicans Weigh Response to 1864 Abortion Ban

      Liberal activists are proposing a ballot measure that would enshrine the right to an abortion in the state Constitution. Republicans in the State Legislature are considering plans to undermine it.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 15, 2024
    9. Audit Questions Purchase of $19,000 Lectern by Arkansas Governor’s Office

      The legislative audit found several ways that the heavily scrutinized purchase potentially violated state law. Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders criticized the findings.

      By EDUARDO MEDINA

      April 15, 2024
    10. Park Rangers Search for 2 Vandals Who Toppled Ancient Rocks at Lake Mead

      After a video was widely shared online of two men pushing over a rock formation at Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada, the authorities are asking for the public’s help to identify them.

      By REBECCA CARBALLO

      April 15, 2024
    11. Johnson Says House Will Vote on Stalled Aid to Israel and Ukraine

      The speaker, who has delayed for months amid G.O.P. opposition to funding for Kyiv, said he would bring up foreign aid legislation along with a bill aimed at appeasing Republican skeptics.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON, KAYLA GUO and CARL HULSE

      April 15, 2024
    12. Bidens Report Earning $620,000 and Paying $181,000 in Taxes in 2023

      The couple’s tax return showed a 7 percent jump in income from 2022, a result of higher taxable interest income this year.

      By ZACH MONTAGUE

      April 15, 2024
    13. Donald Trump, the Defendant

      Trump has tried to project strength and confidence around his New York trial, but it might not be easy.

      By JESS BIDGOOD

      April 15, 2024
    14. Federal Officials to Shut Women’s Prison After Years of Sexual Abuse

      About 600 inmates housed at the troubled facility in the San Francisco Bay Area will be transferred to other federal institutions.

      By HEATHER KNIGHT

      April 15, 2024
    15. Owners of Funeral Home With Decaying Bodies Are Charged With Covid Relief Fraud

      Originally charged after 190 decomposing bodies were found at their Colorado funeral home, the couple now face federal charges that they fraudulently obtained $880,000 in relief funds.

      By JESUS JIMÉNEZ

      April 15, 2024
    16. Supreme Court Clears Way, for Now, for Idaho to Ban Transgender Treatment for Minors

      The Idaho attorney general had asked the justices to move swiftly to let the state law, which would ban gender-affirming medical care for minors, go into effect.

      By ABBIE VANSICKLE

      April 15, 2024
    17. TRUMP ON TRIAL

      A Historic Day

      Trump arrived this morning at Criminal Court in Lower Manhattan, as jury selection began in the first criminal trial of a former president.

      By JESSE MCKINLEY

      April 15, 2024
    18. Supreme Court Poised to Cut Back Scope of Anti-Corruption Law

      The question for the justices was whether a federal law prohibits not only before-the-fact bribes but also after-the-fact rewards.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 15, 2024
    19. New Migrants Get Work Permits. Other Undocumented Immigrants Want Them, Too.

      Long-term undocumented immigrants — and their employers — are feeling left out by Biden administration policies allowing most who just crossed the border to work legally.

      By MIRIAM JORDAN and LYDIA DEPILLIS

      April 15, 2024
    20. Transgender Veterans Sue V.A. Over Gender-Affirming Surgeries

      The lawsuit, brought by the Transgender American Veterans Association, said the Veteran Affairs department’s decision not to offer the procedures was discriminatory.

      By AISHVARYA KAVI

      April 15, 2024
    21. NEWS ANALYSIS

      With Nuclear Deal Dead, Containing Iran Grows More Fraught

      The U.S., Europe, Russia and China worked together on a 2015 deal to limit Iran’s nuclear program. The arrangement’s unraveling and the spike in superpower tensions make this a dangerous moment.

      By DAVID E. SANGER

      April 15, 2024
    22. Biden and His Allies Are Likely to Stay Quiet on Trump’s Manhattan Trial

      The president’s campaign and other Democrats believe that the court proceedings will do their work for them and that messaging should focus on Mr. Biden’s record.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 15, 2024
    23. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      We’re Adding to Our California Movie List

      “Harold and Maude,” “The Grapes of Wrath” and more.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 15, 2024
    24. Pentagon Reviews Events Before Attack That Killed 13 U.S. Troops in Kabul

      A team conducted new interviews to address lingering questions about the bombing in the final days of U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan.

      By ERIC SCHMITT

      April 15, 2024
    25. Severe Storms Expected in the Plains and Midwest

      Large hail, damaging winds, heavy rain and isolated tornadoes are expected on Monday in the Plains before moving into the Midwest on Tuesday.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      April 15, 2024
    26. A Show of Might in the Skies Over Israel

      Iran’s retaliation for Israel’s killing of senior military leaders was a highly choreographed spectacle. But fears of a wider war still loom.

      By HELENE COOPER, FARNAZ FASSIHI, AARON BOXERMAN, PATRICK KINGSLEY and ERIC SCHMITT

      April 15, 2024
    27. U.S. Awards Samsung $6.4 Billion to Bolster Semiconductor Production

      The federal grants will support Samsung’s new chip manufacturing hub in Taylor, Texas, along with the expansion of an existing site in Austin.

      By MADELEINE NGO and DON CLARK

      April 15, 2024
    28. SIDEBAR

      Questions About Assassinations Test the Limits of Trump’s Immunity Claim

      Three Supreme Court briefs from former military leaders and intelligence officials explore whether presidents may be prosecuted for ordering unlawful killings.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 15, 2024
    29. In the 2024 Race, Trump’s Trial Is About to Take Center Stage

      The race for president will shift much of its focus to a Manhattan courtroom. “This looks like no other presidential campaign in the history of the country,” one Republican pollster said.

      By SHANE GOLDMACHER, JONATHAN SWAN and MAGGIE HABERMAN

      April 15, 2024
    30. What’s Killing Endangered Sawfish in Florida?

      First, fish off the Florida Keys started swimming in spirals or upside down. Then, endangered sawfish started dying. Scientists are racing to figure out why.

      By PATRICIA MAZZEI

      April 15, 2024
    31. Sununu Says Trump ‘Contributed’ to Insurrection, but Still Has His Support

      The New Hampshire governor, who has been critical of the former president and supported Nikki Haley in the primary, said he wanted a Republican in the White House.

      By MAGGIE ASTOR

      April 14, 2024
    32. Johnson Says the House Will Vote on an Israel Bill in the Coming Days

      Speaker Mike Johnson left unclear whether the vote on the security package, coming after Iranian attacks on Israel, would also include aid for Ukraine.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 14, 2024
    33. Four Years Out, Some Voters Look Back at Trump’s Presidency More Positively

      A new poll by The New York Times and Siena College finds that voters think highly of the former president’s record on the economy, but memories of his divisiveness largely remain intact.

      By LISA LERER and RUTH IGIELNIK

      April 14, 2024
    34. How Women at One Arizona Clinic Are Grappling With the Abortion Ruling

      Inside Acacia Women’s Center, patients described a mix of fear, anger and anxiety after the State Supreme Court’s decision to reinstate a law that bans nearly all abortions.

      By JACK HEALY and CAITLIN O’HARA

      April 14, 2024
    35. As Trump Ponders V.P. Contenders, He Asks: Can They Help Me Raise Cash?

      Donald Trump’s concerns about money may have entered his vice-presidential calculations, along with political considerations and which contenders he likes the look of.

      By MICHAEL C. BENDER

      April 14, 2024
    36. Jan. 6 Obstruction Case at Supreme Court Could Help Trump and Many Others

      The justices will hear arguments on Tuesday in a case that could alter hundreds of prosecutions for the assault on the Capitol and help define its meaning.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 14, 2024
    37. This Prosecutor Pledged to Change George Floyd’s City. Her Critics Are Circling.

      Mary Moriarty, a former chief public defender, became the top prosecutor in Minneapolis, promising an overhaul. Now she faces criticism, including from fellow Democrats.

      By ERNESTO LONDOÑO

      April 14, 2024
    38. In Final Rally Before New York Trial, Trump Again Casts Himself as Political Victim

      Campaigning in Pennsylvania on Saturday, Donald J. Trump once more falsely asserted that his criminal charges were an attempt by Democrats to keep him from the White House.

      By MICHAEL GOLD

      April 14, 2024
    39. What Happened to Damages That O.J. Simpson Owed to the Victims’ Families?

      In 1997, a jury in a civil trial awarded the families of Ronald Goldman and Nicole Brown Simpson $33 million. Today, the amount still owed has more than tripled.

      By ANNA BETTS

      April 13, 2024
    40. Inside Donald Trump’s Embrace of the Jan. 6 Rioters

      The former president initially disavowed the attack on the Capitol, but he is now making it a centerpiece of his general election campaign.

      By ALAN FEUER and MAGGIE HABERMAN

      April 13, 2024
    41. Four South Dakota Tribes Bar Gov. Kristi Noem, Trump V.P. Contender, From Lands

      The tribes barred the Republican governor from their reservations after she told lawmakers that Mexican drug cartels had a foothold there and were committing murders.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 13, 2024
    42. State Dept. Is Sending Its Top Diplomat for East Asia to China

      The announcement comes days after President Biden met jointly with the leaders of Japan and the Philippines to discuss Chinese aggression in the Indo-Pacific region.

      By AISHVARYA KAVI

      April 13, 2024
    43. Election Workers Face Flood of Threats, but Charges Are Few

      The Justice Department has a task force focused on the thousands of threats against state and local officials who oversee voting, but most are protected by the First Amendment.

      By EILEEN SULLIVAN

      April 13, 2024
    44. Lawmaker Presses Luxury Designer After Reports of Exploiting Indigenous Workers

      A freshman congressman is demanding answers from the fashion house Loro Piana, which sources wool from his native Peru and faces accusations of exploiting workers there.

      By ROBERT JIMISON

      April 13, 2024
    45. Wyoming Democratic Caucus Results

      Get live election results and maps from the 2024 Wyoming Democratic presidential caucus.

       
      April 13, 2024
    46. Cross-Tabs: April 2024 Times/Siena Poll of Registered Voters Nationwide

      Donald Trump leads Joe Biden, 46 percent to 45 percent, among registered voters.

       
      April 13, 2024
    47. Toplines: April 2024 Times/Siena Poll of Registered Voters Nationwide

      Results of a nationwide New York Times/Siena College poll conducted among 1,059 registered voters from April 7 to 11, 2024.

       
      April 13, 2024
    48. Cross-Tabs: April 2024 Times/Siena Poll of the Likely Electorate

      Donald Trump leads Joe Biden, 47 percent to 46 percent, among the likely electorate.

       
      April 13, 2024
    49. Biden Shrinks Trump’s Edge in Latest Times/Siena Poll

      The president’s popularity has ticked up slightly, though voters still view Donald J. Trump more favorably and have dour views of the economy.

      By SHANE GOLDMACHER

      April 13, 2024
    50. O.J. Simpson Trial Served as a Landmark Moment for Domestic Violence Awareness

      His acquittal in the infamous trial involving Nicole Brown Simpson’s death prompted powerful backlash that helped change the perception around domestic violence.

      By SHAILA DEWAN and JULIE BOSMAN

      April 13, 2024
    51. The Landline’s Not Dead (at Least at the Masters)

      Augusta National Golf Club has long forbidden cellphones for almost anyone at its hallowed tournament, but patrons delight in making free calls the old-school way.

      By ALAN BLINDER and DOUG MILLS

      April 13, 2024
    52. You Ask, We Answer: How The Times/Siena Poll Is Conducted

      The New York Times/Siena College Poll has earned a reputation for accuracy and transparency. But as with any poll, there are limits to just how much you can derive.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 13, 2024
    53. Pittsburgh Reopens Bridge After 26 Barges Break Loose on Ohio River

      The barges, some carrying coal, damaged a marina. One barge, which likely sank, remained missing on Saturday, an official said.

      By JOHN YOON

      April 13, 2024
    54. Biotech Exec Gets 7 Years in Prison for False Claims About Rapid Covid-19 Test

      Prosecutors said Keith Berman falsely claimed he had invented a blood test that could detect Covid-19 in 15 seconds. His lawyer said he had put “genuine effort” into developing such a test.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      April 12, 2024
    55. Judge Rejects Hunter Biden Claim of Selective Prosecution in Gun Case

      Judge Maryellen Noreika declined to dismiss the charges against the president’s son, saying Mr. Biden’s lawyer failed to show prosecutors had been motivated by animus.

      By GLENN THRUSH

      April 12, 2024
    56. Johnson Floats Voting on Senate Ukraine Bill, With Conservative Policies as Sweeteners

      The Republican speaker has weighed bringing up a $95 billion Senate-passed bill to aid Ukraine and Israel in tandem with a separate package geared toward mollifying G.O.P. critics.

      By CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 12, 2024
    57. What Is the Powerful Surveillance Law That Divided Lawmakers?

      Under Section 702, the government is empowered to collect, without a warrant, the messages of Americans communicating with targeted foreigners abroad.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE

      April 12, 2024
    58. Trump Co-Defendants Argue for Dismissal of Charges in Documents Case

      The judge did not rule on motions by lawyers for Walt Nauta and Carlos De Oliveira, who are accused of helping the former president obstruct government efforts to recover classified material.

      By EILEEN SULLIVAN

      April 12, 2024
    59. Harris Blasts Trump on Abortion at Arizona Campaign Stop

      At a rally in Tucson, Ariz., days after the state’s top court upheld a near-total ban on abortion, Vice President Kamala Harris placed the blame directly on former President Donald J. Trump.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 12, 2024
    60. TIMESVIDEO

      Harris Blasts Trump on Abortion in Arizona

      During a campaign rally, Vice President Kamala Harris blamed former President Donald J. Trump for the Arizona Supreme Court’s ruling to uphold a near-total ban on abortion.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 12, 2024
    61. Governing the Ungovernable

      House Speaker Mike Johnson has problems in Washington. Trump can help, and hurt.

      By JESS BIDGOOD

      April 12, 2024
    62. Republican Women Are Divided on Abortion as Bans Spread

      Across the country, fractures are emerging among conservative and centrist women, as they confront a steady drumbeat of new abortion restrictions and court rulings.

      By ELIZABETH DIAS and LISA LERER

      April 12, 2024
    63. Former U.S. Ambassador Is Sentenced to 15 Years for Acting as Cuban Agent

      Manuel Rocha pleaded guilty to two charges, including conspiring to defraud the United States as a foreign agent, under an agreement with the U.S. government.

      By PATRICIA MAZZEI

      April 12, 2024
    64. Bennett Braun, Psychiatrist Who Fueled ‘Satanic Panic,’ Dies at 83

      He diagnosed dozens of patients with what he said were suppressed memories of being tortured by cults. He later lost his license.

      By CLAY RISEN

      April 12, 2024
    65. Pennsylvania and West Virginia Brace for More Flooding

      Up to four inches fell in less than 24 hours across broad sections of both states, and officials were watching rising waterways warily.

      By CHRISTINE HAUSER

      April 12, 2024
    66. TIMESVIDEO

      Pro-Palestinian Protesters Complicate Democrats’ Ability to Campaign

      Lisa Lerer, a political correspondent for The New York Times, explains how protests over the Biden administration’s handling of the Israel-Hamas war are disrupting the activities of Democratic officials from city halls to Congress to the White House.

      By LISA LERER, REBECCA SUNER and GABRIEL BLANCO

      April 12, 2024
    67. 1 Killed and 13 Injured in ‘Intentional’ Truck Crash Into Building in Texas

      The authorities said that a man driving a semitrailer truck crashed into a Department of Public Safety office in Brenham, Texas, after he had been denied a commercial driver’s license.

      By EMMETT LINDNER and JESUS JIMÉNEZ

      April 12, 2024
    68. At Berkeley, a Protest at a Dean’s Home Tests the Limits of Free Speech

      Pro-Palestinian supporters disrupted a dinner for law students. There was a tussle over the microphone and conflicting claims of harm.

      By VIMAL PATEL

      April 12, 2024
    69. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Campaign Puts Trump and the Spy Agencies on a Collision Course

      As president, Donald Trump never trusted the intelligence community. His antipathy has only grown since he left office, with potentially serious implications should he return to power.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE, JULIAN E. BARNES and ALAN FEUER

      April 12, 2024
    70. Biden Wipes Out Another $7.4 Billion in Student Loan Debt

      President Biden is hoping to shore up support with young voters who are disproportionately affected by soaring education costs. So far, he has canceled $153 billion in debt.

      By ZACH MONTAGUE

      April 12, 2024
    71. D.N.C. Helped Pay Biden’s Legal Bills in Special Counsel Investigation

      The money spent paled in comparison to the amount Donald J. Trump has used in supporters’ donations to pay his own legal bills, but it was laid out even as aides for Mr. Biden attacked Mr. Trump for the practice.

      By REID J. EPSTEIN

      April 12, 2024
    72. Ocasio-Cortez Never Steered Money to a Key Arm of Her Party. Until Now.

      Her contribution to the campaign arm of House Democrats is a symbolic moment in the New York lawmaker’s own evolution inside the Democratic Party.

      By SHANE GOLDMACHER

      April 12, 2024
    73. House Passes 2-Year Surveillance Law Extension Without Warrant Requirement

      Speaker Mike Johnson scaled back the measure to two years from five after Donald J. Trump had urged Republicans to “kill” it. An effort to require warrants to search for Americans’ messages failed on a tie.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE and LUKE BROADWATER

      April 12, 2024
    74. Speaker Johnson Gets Lifeline From Trump Amid Threat to His Job

      Mr. Johnson met with former President Donald J. Trump at Mar-a-Lago, where they found common cause in stoking unfounded fears of election fraud.

      By MICHAEL GOLD

      April 12, 2024
    75. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Angelenos Reflect on a ‘Big Moment in American History’

      The murder trial of O.J. Simpson was a defining part of a turbulent era in Los Angeles.

      By JILL COWAN and SHAWN HUBLER

      April 12, 2024
    76. Mistaken Autopsy Report Compounds Grief After a Balloon Pilot’s Death

      The pilot, Cornelius van der Walt, died in a crash in Arizona that also killed three others. While the autopsy found he had ketamine in his system, it had been administered by medics after the crash.

      By CLAIRE MOSES

      April 12, 2024
    77. Fatal Shooting of Driver by Chicago Police Is Under Investigation

      Chicago police officers stopped Dexter Reed Jr. last month and fired 96 shots after he fired first and wounded an officer, investigators said.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      April 12, 2024
    78. The O.J. Simpson Trial: What Happened to the Main Figures

      Some, like Marcia Clark and Mark Fuhrman, gained fame in other arenas. Others lived quieter lives.

      By ANNA BETTS

      April 12, 2024
    79. Democratic Coalition Sends Biden a Demand on Military Aid to Israel

      In a letter, a dozen groups and labor unions called on the president to enforce a law that bars military support from going to any nation that restricts the delivery of humanitarian aid.

      By REID J. EPSTEIN

      April 12, 2024
    80. Kamala Harris, Traveling to Arizona, Will Slam Trump Over Abortion

      The vice president is set to lean into a partywide attack on Donald Trump and fellow Republicans, who are newly on the defensive over the issue.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS, LISA LERER and REID J. EPSTEIN

      April 12, 2024
    81. Where Kamala Harris Lives, a Little-Known History of Enslavement

      The vice president’s official residence is in a quiet Washington enclave once home to 34 enslaved people. Ms. Harris has sought to reconnect the property to its Black heritage.

      By ROBERT DRAPER

      April 12, 2024
    82. With State Bans on D.E.I., Some Universities Find a Workaround: Rebranding

      Welcome to the new “Office of Access and Engagement.” Schools are renaming departments and job titles to try to preserve diversity programs.

      By STEPHANIE SAUL

      April 12, 2024
    83. How the War in Gaza Mobilized the American Left

      As the death toll in Gaza climbed, the pro-Palestinian movement grew into a powerful, if disjointed, political force in the United States. Democrats are feeling the pressure.

      By KATIE GLUECK, KATIE BENNER and SHEERA FRENKEL

      April 12, 2024
    84. In Los Angeles, the O.J. Simpson Case Defined a Turbulent Era

      From the car chase to the verdict, the murder case became an inextricable part of Los Angeles history in the 1990s, and Angelenos to this day still ponder what happened.

      By CORINA KNOLL, SHAWN HUBLER and JILL COWAN

      April 11, 2024
    85. Kari Lake Backs G.O.P. Effort to Drop 1864 Abortion Law in Favor of 15-Week Ban

      The Senate candidate and Donald Trump ally is supporting a handful of state Republicans who have backed away from a near-total ban that was upheld by the State Supreme Court this week.

      By KELLEN BROWNING and JACK HEALY

      April 11, 2024
    86. Trump, Who Tried to Repeal Obamacare, Says He Is ‘Not Running to Terminate’ It

      After repeated attacks from Democrats, Donald Trump, who has often vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, said that if elected he would only improve it, without offering specifics.

      By ANJALI HUYNH

      April 11, 2024
    87. Share Your Story About the Organ Transplant System

      We want to hear from patients as well as doctors, nurses, technicians, medical residents and any others with experience in the system.

      By BRIAN M. ROSENTHAL and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG

      April 11, 2024
    88. Kennedy Campaign Fires Consultant Who Sought to Help Trump Win

      The Kennedy campaign said the consultant, Rita Palma, had falsely identified herself as its New York state director.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 11, 2024
    89. Texas Surgeon Is Accused of Secretly Denying Liver Transplants

      A Houston hospital is investigating whether a doctor altered a transplant list to make his patients ineligible for care. A disproportionate number of them have died while waiting for new organs.

      By BRIAN M. ROSENTHAL and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG

      April 11, 2024
    90. Trump to Meet an Embattled Johnson, Putting Their Tortured Ties on Display

      The presumptive Republican presidential nominee and the G.O.P. speaker, at odds over many issues, are making common cause on “election integrity.”

      By ANNIE KARNI

      April 11, 2024
    91. New Trump Super PAC Says It Has $27 Million After Its First Major Event

      The group’s biggest donor is Isaac Perlmutter, the former Marvel Entertainment chief executive who supported the organization when it formed weeks ago.

      By MAGGIE HABERMAN

      April 11, 2024
    92. Woman Who Stabbed Childhood Friend to Impress ‘Slender Man’ Won’t Be Released

      A judge denied Morgan Geyser’s request for release on Thursday, nearly a decade after the attack by a pair of 12-year-olds against their friend stunned residents of Waukesha, Wis.

      By EMILY SCHMALL

      April 11, 2024
    93. Democrats Hammer a Simple Attack on Abortion: Donald Trump Did This

      The party is unifying around a blunt message that Vice President Kamala Harris pushed for privately ahead of her Friday trip to Arizona, where Democrats hope to keep Republicans reeling.

      By LISA LERER, REID J. EPSTEIN and NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 11, 2024
    94. Evan Stark, 82, Dies; Broadened Understanding of Domestic Violence

      He and his wife wrote pioneering studies; he used the term “coercive control” to describe psychological and physical dominance by abusers.

      By RICHARD SANDOMIR

      April 11, 2024
    95. Trump’s Co-Defendants in Documents Case Seek to Dismiss Charges

      Walt Nauta and Carlos De Oliveira, who still work for the former president, will be in federal court in Florida on Friday asking a judge to throw out charges that they helped obstruct the investigation.

      By ALAN FEUER and EILEEN SULLIVAN

      April 11, 2024
    96. TRUMP ON TRIAL

      Finally, a Case Goes to Trial

      Jury selection begins Monday in Donald Trump’s hush-money trial.

      By JESSE MCKINLEY

      April 11, 2024
    97. Liberal Justice to Retire From Wisconsin Supreme Court, Leaving Control Uncertain

      Justice Ann Walsh Bradley, whose term ends in July 2025, said she will not seek re-election. The race to replace her will decide whether the court has a liberal or conservative majority.

      By JULIE BOSMAN

      April 11, 2024
    98. Dish Soap to Help Build Planes? Boeing Signs Off on Supplier’s Method.

      An F.A.A. audit found Spirit AeroSystems using Dawn soap and a hotel key card in the manufacturing process. The company says its techniques were inventive, not careless.

      By MARK WALKER

      April 11, 2024
    99. John Bolton, Former Trump Adviser, Says He Will Vote for Dick Cheney

      The diplomat, a fixture in multiple Republican administrations who now opposes Mr. Trump, said he also voted for the former vice president in 2020.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 11, 2024
    100. April 11, 2024
    101. Georgia’s Lieutenant Governor to Face Inquiry for Role as Fake Trump Elector

      Fani T. Willis, the district attorney of Fulton County, Ga., had been disqualified from pursuing the case against Lt. Gov. Burt Jones, but another prosecutor said he would now take it over.

      By RICHARD FAUSSET and DANNY HAKIM

      April 11, 2024
    102. How Voters Describe the 2024 Election in One Word

      To dig into the complex views voters have about the upcoming rematch, we asked poll respondents to describe their feelings in their own words.

      By CAMILLE BAKER

      April 11, 2024
    103. Harvard and Caltech Will Require Test Scores for Admission

      The universities are the latest highly selective schools to end their policies that made submitting SAT or ACT scores optional.

      By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS and STEPHANIE SAUL

      April 11, 2024
    104. The Joys and Challenges of Caring for Terrance the Octopus

      The Clifford family of Edmond, Okla., tracked down an octopus for their son Cal, 9, who has been infatuated with the sea animals for years. What they didn’t expect were the 50 hatchlings.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      April 11, 2024
    105. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Richard Lyons, Former Business School Dean, Will Be U.C. Berkeley’s New Chancellor

      The appointment comes as Berkeley and college campuses across the country are facing turmoil over free speech, racial and political diversity, and affordability.

      By JILL COWAN

      April 11, 2024
    106. ‘Save Democracy’ Democrats Look to Win Primaries on Anti-Trump Sentiment

      In two races in Maryland and Virginia, candidates are turning political fame into campaigns, and a Pennsylvania race is focused on a congressman’s role in Trump’s efforts to overturn his 2020 loss.

      By JONATHAN WEISMAN

      April 11, 2024
    107. Biden Aims to Project United Front Against China at White House Summit

      President Biden discussed security in the South China Sea with the leaders of Japan and the Philippines at the White House.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 11, 2024
    108. Biden Administration Approves Expansion of Background Checks on Gun Sales

      The new rule, which is likely to face legal challenges, is an attempt to regulate a fast-growing shadow market of weapons that has fueled gun violence.

      By GLENN THRUSH and ERICA L. GREEN

      April 11, 2024
    109. Tracing Charleston’s History of Slavery, From a Burial Ground to a DNA Swab

      A quest to find living descendants of 36 enslaved people has transformed into a project that gives Black residents new clues to their ancestry, wherever it may lead.

      By CAROLINE GUTMAN and EMILY COCHRANE

      April 11, 2024
    110. Before Teacher Was Shot, Assistant Principal Was Warned First Grader Had a Gun

      A Virginia grand jury found that the administrator had not acted on reports from staff members that the 6-year-old had brought a firearm to Richneck Elementary.

      By MATTATHIAS SCHWARTZ

      April 10, 2024
    111. Read the Special Grand Jury Report

      A special grand jury found that the shooting of an elementary teacher by a 6-year-old student in Newport News, Va., last year was preceded by a “shocking” series of lapses by the school’s assistant principal at the time.

       
      April 10, 2024
    112. THE SCENE

      Biden’s State Dinner for Japan Was Heavy on Symbolism (and Yes, Cherry Blossoms)

      The event’s musical guest, Paul Simon, even learned a little Japanese for the occasion.

      By KATIE ROGERS

      April 10, 2024
    113. City of Miami Racially Gerrymandered Voting Districts, Judge Finds

      The federal judge threw out the city’s voting map, rejecting the rationale that city commissioners have used for more than 20 years.

      By PATRICIA MAZZEI

      April 10, 2024
    114. A Gold Medal for America’s Rosies, the Women on the Home Front

      Rosie the Riveters, American women who filled a crucial labor shortage during World War II and reshaped the work force, were honored at the Capitol.

      By KAYLA GUO

      April 10, 2024
    115. How the G.O.P. Molded the Arizona Court That Upheld the Abortion Ban

      Arizona’s former governor, Doug Ducey, expanded the court to seven justices. All solid conservatives, they upheld a 160-year-old abortion ban that presents a political risk to Republicans.

      By DAVID W. CHEN and MICHAEL WINES

      April 10, 2024
    116. What Biden and Kishida Agreed To in Their Effort to Bolster Ties

      As they look to contain an increasingly aggressive China, the United States and Japan announced dozens of new agreements, including on military, economic, climate and space matters.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 10, 2024
    117. Two Imperfect Messengers Take On Abortion

      Neither side of the abortion divide would probably design the exact candidate they have in 2024.

      By JESS BIDGOOD

      April 10, 2024
    118. The Full Guest List for Biden’s State Dinner With Japan

      The Bidens invited more than 200 guests, including Bill and Hillary Clinton, Robert De Niro, Jeff Bezos, Masayoshi Son, Tim Cook and Kristi Yamaguchi.

      By MINHO KIM

      April 10, 2024
    119. Trump Again Insults Jews Who Support Biden

      Speaking to reporters in Atlanta on Wednesday, former President Donald J. Trump said that any Jew who “votes for Biden should have their head examined.”

      By MICHAEL GOLD

      April 10, 2024
    120. Cornel West Picks a Black Lives Matter Activist as His Running Mate

      Melina Abdullah, a racial justice activist in Los Angeles and professor of Pan-African Studies at California State University, joins the independent presidential ticket.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 10, 2024
    121. Thomas Gumbleton, Catholic Bishop and a Progressive Voice, Dies at 94

      He was arrested protesting war and clashed with fellow bishops in supporting gay marriage and the ordination of women and championing victims of sex abuse by priests.

      By TRIP GABRIEL

      April 10, 2024
    122. Without More Aid, Ukraine Could Lose the War, U.S. General Says

      The United States gives Ukraine’s military most of two critical munitions that are in shortest supply: artillery shells and air-defense interceptors.

      By ERIC SCHMITT

      April 10, 2024
    123. Man Charged With Detonating Explosive Outside Alabama Attorney General’s Office

      The authorities said that the suspect in the February episode had acknowledged on social media that he had “violent impulses” and espoused antigovernment views.

      By LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA

      April 10, 2024
    124. At Least 3 Injured in Shooting at Philadelphia Eid Celebration

      The shooting took place on Wednesday afternoon in West Philadelphia, where 1,000 people were gathered to mark the end of Ramadan.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      April 10, 2024
    125. Johnson to Join Trump at Mar-a-Lago for ‘Election Integrity’ Announcement

      The meeting comes at an awkward moment in the relationship between the speaker and the former president, who are at cross purposes on an intelligence bill and Ukraine.

      By ANNIE KARNI

      April 10, 2024
    126. Japan Gives Washington 250 Cherry Trees as Replacements

      The trees will replace 140 that will be torn up as part of a restoration project. The capital’s first Japanese cherry trees were a gift from the mayor of Tokyo in 1912.

      By AISHVARYA KAVI

      April 10, 2024
    127. Student Aid Woes Stalk Education Secretary in Appearance on Capitol Hill

      In two hearings, House lawmakers scrutinized Miguel Cardona’s record over persistent problems with the new FAFSA form.

      By ZACH MONTAGUE

      April 10, 2024
    128. TIMESVIDEO

      Severe Weather Slams Gulf Coast States

      Several cities faced torrential rain and tornado threats as a powerful storm system moved across the South.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 10, 2024
    129. In Arizona’s Crucial Senate Race, a Liberal Fighter Courts the Center

      Ruben Gallego has long embraced his progressive background. Now, with his state newly in the spotlight over abortion politics, he’s getting tough on the border and targeting swing voters.

      By KELLEN BROWNING

      April 10, 2024
    130. Biden Says U.S. Is Considering Dropping Its Case Against Assange

      The WikiLeaks founder has been held in London as he has battled extradition to the United States on charges related to his publication of classified documents.

      By ERICA L. GREEN

      April 10, 2024
    131. Arizona Republicans Thwart Attempts to Repeal 1864 Abortion Ban

      Democrats in both houses of the Legislature were blocked from advancing bills to roll back the reinstated ban on nearly all abortions in the state.

      By JACK HEALY and KATE ZERNIKE

      April 10, 2024
    132. Joining Texas, Iowa Enacts Law for State Immigration Enforcement

      Gov. Kim Reynolds, a Republican, signed the bill on Wednesday and accused the Biden administration of failing to secure the border.

      By MITCH SMITH

      April 10, 2024
    133. Trump Says He Wouldn’t Sign a Federal Abortion Ban, Criticizing Arizona Ruling

      Days after he said that abortion policies should be left to the states, former President Donald J. Trump criticized an Arizona court ruling that upheld an 1864 law.

      By MICHAEL GOLD

      April 10, 2024
    134. TIMESVIDEO

      Trump Criticizes Arizona Abortion Ban

      During a campaign stop in Atlanta, former President Donald J. Trump said that the Arizona abortion ruling went too far, adding that it will be “straightened out.”

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 10, 2024
    135. TIMESVIDEO

      Biden Hosts Japan’s Prime Minister at the White House

      President Biden called the United States and Japan “the closest of friends” during a welcoming ceremony for Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 10, 2024
    136. Board Member Says Group Declined to Honor Liz Cheney for Fear of Trump

      David Hume Kennerly, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, resigned from the board of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation over what he said was a snub.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 10, 2024
    137. After Trump Broadside, Surveillance Bill Collapses in the House

      Right-wing lawmakers blocked a move by Speaker Johnson to extend a key foreign intelligence surveillance tool after former President Donald J. Trump urged lawmakers to “kill” the law underlying it.

      By LUKE BROADWATER and CHARLIE SAVAGE

      April 10, 2024
    138. Senate Leaders Look to Curb ‘Judge Shopping’ but in Different Ways

      Senators Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell don’t think the federal judiciary is doing enough, and each is introducing a bill to address the issue.

      By MATTATHIAS SCHWARTZ

      April 10, 2024
    139. Kari Lake Called Arizona’s Abortion Ban a ‘Great Law,’ but Now She Denounces It

      In her 2022 race for governor, Ms. Lake delivered a strict anti-abortion message. Now running for Senate, she is retreating from that position.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 10, 2024
    140. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      A Makeover for a Beloved Tourist Destination

      Visitors make Hollywood Boulevard one of their first stops in Los Angeles. But when they arrive, the reality may not match the fantasy.

      By JILL COWAN

      April 10, 2024
    141. Biden and Kishida Agree to Tighten Military and Economic Ties to Counter China

      President Biden is hosting Japan’s prime minister, Fumio Kishida, for a state visit as part of a broad diplomatic outreach.

      By PETER BAKER and MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 10, 2024
    142. See Maps of Where Eclipse Seekers Flocked and the Traffic That Followed

      Movement data shows which towns were destinations for the eclipse and how travelers caused hourslong delays on roads near the path of totality.

      By CHARLIE SMART

      April 10, 2024
    143. Trump Allies Have a Plan to Hurt Biden’s Chances: Elevate Outsider Candidates

      The more candidates in the race, the better for Donald J. Trump, supporters say. And in a tight presidential contest, a small share of voters could change the result.

      By JONATHAN SWAN, MAGGIE HABERMAN, SHANE GOLDMACHER and REBECCA DAVIS O’BRIEN

      April 10, 2024
    144. Tornadoes and Floods Batter Gulf Coast States

      Storms were moving east, setting off numerous warnings and watches from Texas to Florida. There were reports of tornadoes in Louisiana and Texas, with one person killed in a Mississippi storm.

      By CHRISTINE HAUSER, AMANDA HOLPUCH and JUDSON JONES

      April 10, 2024
    145. U.S. Postal Service Proposes Raising Stamp Prices Again

      If a regulatory body approves, a nearly 8 percent rise in postage will take effect in July. It would be the latest of several price hikes since 2021.

      By MIKE IVES

      April 10, 2024
    146. Arizona Ruling Spurs Strong Reactions, but Election Impact Is Unclear

      Some in the battleground state said they would still vote for former President Donald J. Trump even if they were frustrated by the reversal of abortion rights.

      By JACK HEALY and ROWAN MOORE GERETY

      April 10, 2024
    147. Biden’s State Dinner for Japan to Feature Paul Simon and Celebrate Spring

      An elevated California roll and steak with sesame sabayon will be among the dishes presented to Prime Minister Fumio Kishida of Japan at the state dinner on Wednesday.

      By ZACH MONTAGUE

      April 9, 2024
    148. What We Know About the Arizona Abortion Ban

      The state’s highest court upheld an 1864 law that bans nearly all abortions. Here’s what to know about the ruling.

      By ANNA BETTS

      April 9, 2024
    149. Judge Blocks Trump’s Lawyers From Naming Witnesses in Documents Case

      The special counsel had asked that the names of about two dozen government witnesses be redacted from a public version of a court filing to protect against potential threats or harassment.

      By ALAN FEUER

      April 9, 2024
    150. Ex-Assistant Principal at School Where 6-Year-Old Shot Teacher Is Indicted

      A former administrator at Richneck Elementary School in Newport News, Va., where a first-grade teacher was shot last year, has been charged with eight counts of child abuse and neglect.

      By LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA

      April 9, 2024
    151. Former Trump Fund-Raiser Drops Suits Over Hack of Emails

      Elliott Broidy had filed lawsuits against a former C.I.A. officer and three lobbyists accusing them of helping Qatar engineer the theft and distribution of his communications to discredit him.

      By MARK MAZZETTI and KENNETH P. VOGEL

      April 9, 2024
    152. Rev. Cecil Murray, Leader Amid Los Angeles Riots, Dies at 94

      He used his church, First African Methodist Episcopal, as a base to address the social ills that confronted the city’s Black population.

      By CLAY RISEN

      April 9, 2024
    153. Bill in Congress Would Force Action on U.S. Troops’ Blast Exposure

      The Pentagon would be required to modify weapons, update safety guidelines, train medical staff and track individual troops’ exposure to repeated blasts that can injure their brains.

      By DAVE PHILIPPS

      April 9, 2024
    154. More Funding Needed to Prosecute Pandemic Fraud, Justice Dept. Says

      The Justice Department said more than $1.4 billion in stolen relief funds have been seized or forfeited. But estimates of the total stolen run into the tens of billions.

      By MADELEINE NGO

      April 9, 2024
    155. Biden Courts Caregivers, Pledging to Expand Support if He Is Re-elected

      The president called for 12 weeks of paid family or medical leave, large investments in preschool for 4-year-olds and the extension of a child tax credit.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 9, 2024
    156. Biden Condemns Arizona’s Abortion Ban as ‘Cruel’ and ‘Extreme’

      President Biden, who promised to continue to fight for the restoration of Roe v. Wade, said the ban was first enacted “well before women had secured the right to vote.”

      By AISHVARYA KAVI

      April 9, 2024
    157. Read the Arizona Supreme Court’s Abortion Ruling

      The state’s highest court on Tuesday upheld an 1864 law that bans nearly all abortions.

       
      April 9, 2024
    158. Abortion Jumps to the Center of Arizona’s Key 2024 Races

      Democrats quickly aimed to capitalize on a ruling by the state’s highest court upholding an 1864 law that bans nearly all abortions.

      By LISA LERER, NICHOLAS NEHAMAS and REID J. EPSTEIN

      April 9, 2024
    159. Capitol Police Hire Special Prosecutors to Handle Rise in Threats Against Congress

      The police department charged with protecting lawmakers has brought in new attorneys specially responsible for prosecuting people who make violent threats against members of Congress.

      By LUKE BROADWATER and CATIE EDMONDSON

      April 9, 2024
    160. Woman Sentenced to Month in Prison Over Theft of Ashley Biden’s Diary

      Aimee Harris sold the diary to Project Veritas, a right-wing group, in what prosecutors said was a brazen plot to damage Joseph R. Biden Jr. in the 2020 election.

      By ADAM GOLDMAN

      April 9, 2024
    161. Food Aid Program for Mothers and Children Will Provide More Fruits and Vegetables

      The Agriculture Department updated the WIC program to more closely align with nutrition guidelines. The changes also reduce assistance for milk and juice.

      By LINDA QIU

      April 9, 2024
    162. More Voters Shift to Republican Party, Closing Gap With Democrats

      The trend toward the Republican Party among white voters without a college degree has continued, and Democrats have lost ground among Hispanic voters, too.

      By RUTH IGIELNIK

      April 9, 2024
    163. Arizona Reinstates 160-Year-Old Abortion Ban

      The state’s highest court said the law, moribund for decades under Roe v. Wade, was now enforceable, but it put its decision on hold for a lower court to hear other challenges to the law.

      By JACK HEALY and KELLEN BROWNING

      April 9, 2024
    164. Swing-State Republicans Embrace Trump’s New Abortion Stance

      Several of the party’s candidates, particularly those in battleground states, said they favored letting states regulate the procedure instead of having a national ban.

      By NEIL VIGDOR

      April 9, 2024
    165. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Biden’s Trade Moves Raise Tensions Abroad but Draw Cheers in Swing States

      The president’s efforts to restrict Chinese imports and block a Japanese steel merger have pleased labor unions and sent a message to rival Donald J. Trump.

      By JIM TANKERSLEY

      April 9, 2024
    166. F.A.A. Investigates Claims by Boeing Whistle-Blower About Flaws in 787 Dreamliner

      The whistle-blower, an engineer, says that sections of the plane’s body are being assembled in a way that could weaken the aircraft over time. Boeing says there is no safety issue.

      By MARK WALKER and JAMES GLANZ

      April 9, 2024
    167. Another Red-Blue Divide: Money to Feed Kids in the Summer

      Congress passed bipartisan legislation to provide families that rely on subsidized school meals with help buying food over the summer. Nearly half of Republican-led states have yet to sign on.

      By JASON DEPARLE

      April 9, 2024
    168. A day after Trump’s abortion statement, Arizona awaits a key ruling.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      April 9, 2024
    169. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      California Is in Bloom Again

      Wildflowers are beginning to spring to life across the state after another wet winter.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 9, 2024
    170. Greene Escalates Threat Against Johnson, Making the Case for His Ouster

      In a letter to Republicans, the far-right lawmaker from Georgia said the speaker had presided over a “complete and total surrender” to Democrats and President Biden, and must change course or be unseated.

      By ANNIE KARNI

      April 9, 2024
    171. Parents of Michigan School Shooter Sentenced to 10 to 15 Years in Prison

      Jennifer and James Crumbley, whose son killed four people, each faced up to 15 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter convictions.

      By JACEY FORTIN and ANNA BETTS

      April 9, 2024
    172. TIMESVIDEO

      Election Officials Continue to Face Violent Threats

      The New York Times received a file containing hundreds of violent messages against the Colorado secretary of state. Nick Corasaniti, a politics reporter for The New York Times, found that election officials across the country are facing a barrage of threatening messages.

       
      April 9, 2024
    173. As Kushner’s Investment Firm Steps Out, the Potential Conflicts Are Growing

      Jared Kushner’s Affinity Partners has invested more than $1.2 billion, much of it in firms abroad, drawing new scrutiny as his father-in-law, Donald Trump, again seeks the presidency.

      By ERIC LIPTON, JONATHAN SWAN and MAGGIE HABERMAN

      April 9, 2024
    174. To Choose the Menu, Just Win the Masters

      The winner of the most hallowed event in professional golf gets to design the menu (and pay) for the next year’s champions dinner. Jon Rahm, the 2023 winner, supplied a recipe from his grandmother.

      By ALAN BLINDER and DOUG MILLS

      April 9, 2024
    175. NEWS ANALYSIS

      On Abortion, Trump Chose Politics Over Principles. Will It Matter?

      With his video statement on Monday, Donald Trump laid bare how faulty a messenger he had always been for the anti-abortion cause.

      By LISA LERER and ELIZABETH DIAS

      April 8, 2024
    176. Prosecutors Ask Supreme Court to Reject Trump’s Immunity Claim in Election Case

      The filing was the main submission from Jack Smith, the special counsel prosecuting the former president. The case will be argued on April 25.

      By ADAM LIPTAK

      April 8, 2024
    177. What to Know About Biden’s New Student Debt Relief Plan

      The proposal would affect nearly 30 million people and would target groups that have had hardships in repaying their loans.

      By ERICA L. GREEN

      April 8, 2024
    178. College Towns Usually Lift Democrats. Is the Picture More Complicated in 2024?

      An enthusiasm gap among young voters and anger on campuses over Gaza has some Democrats wary.

      By JESS BIDGOOD

      April 8, 2024
    179. Georgia Trump Prosecutor Urges Appeals Court to Decline Disqualification Case

      The prosecutor, Fani Willis, defended a judge’s recent ruling that she could continue leading the election interference case against Donald J. Trump.

      By RICHARD FAUSSET and DANNY HAKIM

      April 8, 2024
    180. Biden Campaign Ad Blames Trump for Near-Death of Woman Who Was Denied Abortion

      The ad encapsulates the strategy by the president’s campaign to seize on anger about the Supreme Court’s 2022 decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and KATIE ROGERS

      April 8, 2024
    181. Col. Ralph Puckett Jr., Belated Medal of Honor Recipient, Dies at 97

      One of the Army’s most highly decorated servicemen, he received the military’s supreme tribute for valor, for his actions in the Korean War — 71 years after the fact.

      By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

      April 8, 2024
    182. France Bracing for Cyberattacks During Summer Olympics

      French officials are visiting Washington for cybersecurity consultations as President Emmanuel Macron predicts Moscow will try to target the Games.

      By JULIAN E. BARNES

      April 8, 2024
    183. Lawyer Kills His Son’s Ex-Wife and Her Current Husband at Las Vegas Law Firm

      The police said that the shooting had happened during a deposition in a child custody case.

      By LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA and JOHNNY DIAZ

      April 8, 2024
    184. Missouri Governor Denies Clemency for Death Row Inmate Who Got Support From Guards

      Dozens of correctional workers urged Gov. Mike Parson to commute the death sentence of Brian Dorsey, who pleaded guilty in the murders of Ben and Sarah Bonnie.

      By MITCH SMITH

      April 8, 2024
    185. Putting Abortion Question to Florida Voters Is Unlikely to End Court Fights

      Though the Florida Supreme Court allowed a ballot question on expanding abortion rights, it also laid out a way for anti-abortion groups to challenge such an expansion.

      By PATRICIA MAZZEI

      April 8, 2024
    186. TIMESVIDEO

      Biden Announces New Plan for Student Debt Relief

      President Biden announced a large-scale effort to help pay off federal student loans for more than 20 million borrowers.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 8, 2024
    187. The Eclipse Across North America

      What people in the path of totality were seeing and saying as the eclipse unfolded across the continent.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      April 8, 2024
    188. Pence Attacks Trump’s Abortion Statement as a ‘Slap in the Face’

      Mike Pence, an evangelical Christian who embraced abortion restrictions at the federal level shortly after Roe was overturned, called Mr. Trump’s statement a “retreat” on the matter.

      By ANJALI HUYNH

      April 8, 2024
    189. Biden and Other Democrats Tie Trump to Limits on Abortion Rights

      The former president said he supported leaving abortion decisions to states, but political opponents say he bears responsibility for any curbs enacted.

      By MAYA KING

      April 8, 2024
    190. In California, Half an Eclipse Is Better Than None

      Californians in the Bay Area and in Southern California braced for a favorable view of the partial eclipse as clouds dissipated on Monday morning.

      By ORLANDO MAYORQUÍN

      April 8, 2024
    191. Dr. Bob, 75, Knows Aging’s Toll. He Wonders if Biden and Trump Do.

      Dr. Bob Ross cares for the aging residents of Ortonville, Minn, even as he wonders whether he, and the presidential candidates, are up to all their tasks.

      By ELI SASLOW and ERIN SCHAFF

      April 8, 2024
    192. How Abortion, and I.V.F., Flipped an Alabama State House Seat

      Marilyn Lands’s victory in a special election provided an early blueprint for Democrats who are eager to make reproductive rights central to their campaigns.

      By MAYA KING and MICAH GREEN

      April 8, 2024
    193. Leading Anti-Abortion Group Says It Is ‘Deeply Disappointed’ in Trump’s Comments

      The president of Susan B. Anthony Pro-Life America said she was “deeply disappointed” in Donald J. Trump’s position that states should decide abortion rights.

      By MAYA KING

      April 8, 2024
    194. Democrats in Pennsylvania Urge Biden to Branch Out Beyond Philadelphia

      Vice President Kamala Harris will stop in the city on Monday to promote efforts to forgive student debt. Some local officials are calling for greater outreach in more rural areas.

      By NICHOLAS NEHAMAS

      April 8, 2024
    195. CALIFORNIA TODAY

      Why a Savory English Pastry Is Beloved in a California Town

      The popularity of the Cornish pasty, a meat pie eaten by hand like a sandwich, is a legacy of the gold rush.

      By SOUMYA KARLAMANGLA

      April 8, 2024
    196. Trump Says Abortion Restrictions Should Be Left to the States

      After months of mixed signals, Donald Trump said that whatever states decide “must be the law of the land,” adding that he was “strongly in favor of exceptions for rape, incest and life of the mother.”

      By MAGGIE HABERMAN, JONATHAN SWAN and MICHAEL GOLD

      April 8, 2024
    197. Containers Are Being Removed From Ship That Hit Key Bridge

      Workers are unloading the 4,700 containers on the ship, a crucial step in moving the vessel and reopening the channel in the Port of Baltimore.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 8, 2024
    198. Biden Announces Student Debt Relief for Millions in Swing-State Pitch

      During an appearance in Wisconsin, President Biden said 10 million borrowers could see debt relief of at least $5,000. The plan could help rally support among young voters.

      By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

      April 8, 2024
    199. TSMC Will Receive $6.6 Billion to Bolster U.S. Chip Manufacturing

      Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company plans to build an additional factory and upgrade another planned facility in Phoenix with the federal grants.

      By MADELEINE NGO and DON CLARK

      April 8, 2024
    200. Democratic Group Aims to Spend Heavily in Wisconsin Legislative Races

      After Wisconsin’s Supreme Court ordered new legislative maps, Democrats are gearing up to try to flip the State Assembly — and give President Biden a boost.

      By NICK CORASANITI

      April 8, 2024
    201. Ex-Officials Urge Curbing Presidential Power to Deploy Troops on U.S. Soil

      The bipartisan group says the point is not about Donald J. Trump’s desire to invoke the Insurrection Act, but rather that current law gives all presidents too much unfettered power.

      By CHARLIE SAVAGE

      April 8, 2024