Australia and New Zealand News New York Times

AustraliaAndNewZealandNewsNewYorkTimes

 

Australia and New Zealand News New York Times

News, features and opinion curated for readers interested in Australia and the region.

    1. What I Learned From an Act of Violence in Sydney That Hit Too Close to Home

      Amid early tidbits of misinformation came lessons about dodging falsities and allowing facts to build a story.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      April 19, 2024
    2. After Months of Cocaine Washing Ashore, Australian Police Make an Arrest

      Drug parcels kept showing up on beaches along Australia’s shoreline. Now, the police say they found the man behind the botched shipment.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 18, 2024
    3. In Australia, ‘Cats Are Just Catastrophic’

      Feral cats take a heavy toll on the world’s wildlife, especially Down Under. The solution? Smarter traps, sharpshooters, survival camp for prey species, and the “Felixer.”

      By EMILY ANTHES and CHANG W. LEE

      April 16, 2024
    4. Validation for Woman Who Said She Was Raped in Australia’s Parliament

      More than three years after Brittany Higgins went public with her claim of rape, her case reached a conclusion of sorts.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 15, 2024
    5. ¿Fue misoginia? Australia se cuestiona tras el ataque masivo

      Quince de las 18 víctimas del sábado eran mujeres. Aunque es posible que nunca se conozcan los motivos del agresor, muchos afirman que el incidente pone de manifiesto un problema mayor.

      By VICTORIA KIM

      April 15, 2024
    6. El ataque en Sídney fue el peor acto de violencia masiva en Australia en años

      El episodio de violencia del sábado en un centro comercial horrorizó a un país poco acostumbrado a este tipo de actos.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 15, 2024
    7. Stabbing of Bishop in Australia During Livestreamed Service Was Act of Terror, Police Say

      A 15-year-old boy has been arrested in the attack, in which several people were injured. An official said the episode appeared to have been motivated by religious extremism.

      By VICTORIA KIM and CLAIRE MOSES

      April 15, 2024
    8. Reeling From Mass Stabbing, Australians Ask: Was It About Hatred of Women?

      All but three of the 18 people killed or injured Saturday were women. While the attacker’s motive may never be known, many said the episode spoke to a larger problem.

      By VICTORIA KIM

      April 15, 2024
    9. Four Wild Ways to Save the Koala (That Just Might Work)

      To protect Australia’s iconic animals, scientists are experimenting with vaccine implants, probiotics, tree-planting drones and solar-powered tracking tags.

      By EMILY ANTHES and CHANG W. LEE

      April 15, 2024
    10. After Stabbing Rampage, Australia Struggles With How and Why

      The police have yet to determine a motive for Saturday’s attack, which left six people dead, but said the assailant had mental-health problems.

      By VICTORIA KIM and YAN ZHUANG

      April 14, 2024
 
    1. Should We Change Species to Save Them?

      When traditional conservation fails, science is using “assisted evolution” to give vulnerable wildlife a chance.

      By EMILY ANTHES and CHANG W. LEE

      April 14, 2024
    2. The Sydney Mall Stabbing Rampage: What We Know

      The attack happened in a busy center for tourists and beachgoers in the eastern suburbs, an affluent area of Sydney.

      By YAN ZHUANG and EMMETT LINDNER

      April 13, 2024
    3. Stabbing Attack in Sydney Kills at Least Six People

      Shoppers hid in backrooms or ran screaming from the scene, while others stayed with injured victims. The police said they believed the attack was not a “terrorism incident.”

      By ISABELLA KWAI, YAN ZHUANG and JOHN YOON

      April 13, 2024
    4. Mall Attack Was Australia’s Worst Mass Violence in Years

      Saturday’s stabbing attack in Sydney horrified a country not used to such acts.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 13, 2024
    5. Witnesses to Sydney Mall Stabbing Describe Harrowing Scenes

      People who were at the scene told of chaos, screaming, wounded victims and a resolute attacker. Many struggled to process the shock hours afterward.

      By JOHN YOON and ISABELLA KWAI

      April 13, 2024
    6. Bondi Junction, Site of Stabbing Attack, Is a Popular and Busy Hub

      As well as a major mall, the area contains cafes and yoga studios. It’s a gateway from central Sydney, Australia, to eastern suburbs and several popular beaches.

      By ISABELLA KWAI

      April 13, 2024
    7. NEW ZEALAND DISPATCH

      New Zealanders Are Crazy for This Fruit. It’s Not the Kiwi.

      Like the kiwi fruit, the feijoa, or pineapple guava, is not native to the island nation, but it has become something of a national obsession.

      By KATE EVANS and TATSIANA CHYPSANAVA

      April 12, 2024
    8. LETTER 349

      Indigenous Authors and the Challenge of Telling Their Own Story

      A university program seeks to improve cross-cultural understanding in Australia’s publishing industry.

      By JULIA BERGIN

      April 12, 2024
    9. Biden Says U.S. Is Considering Dropping Its Case Against Assange

      The WikiLeaks founder has been held in London as he has battled extradition to the United States on charges related to his publication of classified documents.

      By ERICA L. GREEN

      April 10, 2024
    10. Navigating a Virtual Australia in Postapocalyptic Ruins

      The role-playing game Broken Roads takes its environment seriously. The Aussie slang, the reddish outback soil, even the ruffling of emu feathers provide authenticity.

      By DARRYN KING

      April 10, 2024
 
    1. Fjords, Pharaohs or Koalas? Time to Plan for Your Next Eclipse.

      If you can’t get enough of totality, or missed out this time, you’ll have three more chances in the next four years in destinations like Iceland, Spain, Egypt and Australia.

      By DANIELLE DOWLING

      April 9, 2024
    2. LETTER 348

      In Australia, a Nation’s Banh Mi Love Affair

      “We’ll make the best of it here. And they can call it a pork roll.”

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 5, 2024
    3. How Beagles and a Fever Dream Made Rebel Wilson a Star

      The actress, known for roles in the “Pitch Perfect” movies, gets vulnerable about her weight loss, sexuality and money in her new memoir, “Rebel Rising.”

      By ALEXANDRA ALTER

      April 3, 2024
    4. In Move to Protect Whales, Polynesian Indigenous Groups Give Them ‘Personhood’

      Indigenous leaders of New Zealand, Tahiti and the Cook Islands signed a treaty that recognizes whales as legal persons. Conservationists hope it will lead to legal protections.

      By REMY TUMIN

      March 29, 2024
    5. LETTER 347

      A River Awakens, Bringing Green Magic to a Desert Town

      After a stunning week of rain, the Todd River in Alice Springs flows once again, bringing a beleaguered community together.

      By JULIA BERGIN

      March 28, 2024
    6. As Relations Thaw, China Lifts Tariffs on Australian Wine

      Despite its thirst for Australian wine, China had taxed the imports in 2020 over a dispute about Covid-19.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 28, 2024
    7. Happy-Go-Lucky Australia Is Feeling Neither Happy, Nor Lucky

      After enjoying decades of prosperity, the country has hit stubborn economic turbulence.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 27, 2024
    8. Apple sigue acumulando problemas por todo el mundo

      La demanda del Departamento de Justicia de Estados Unidos contra Apple es la más reciente de una serie de acciones reguladoras que están golpeando al gigante tecnológico al mismo tiempo.

      By TRIPP MICKLE

      March 22, 2024
    9. What We Gained (and Lost) When Our Daughter Unplugged for a School Year

      My 13-year-old has left her phone behind for hiking, chores and study in the Australian wilderness. Our pen-and-paper correspondence is opening up an unexpected world.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      March 22, 2024
    10. LETTER 346

      In New Zealand, Experiencing the Miracle of Flight Anew

      The country's domestic airlines play a crucial role in connectivity. But for the casual flier, even the journey is captivating.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 21, 2024
 
    1. Overlooked No More: Yvonne Barr, Who Helped Discover a Cancer-Causing Virus

      A virologist, she worked with the pathologist Anthony Epstein, who died last month, in finding for the first time that a virus that could cause cancer. It’s known as the Epstein-Barr virus.

      By DELTHIA RICKS

      March 21, 2024
    2. March 21, 2024
    3. A Museum’s Feminist Artwork Excluded Men. So One Man Took It to Court.

      Gender-based discrimination is central to the women-only art installation, in Australia, but one visitor claims it is also illegal.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 20, 2024
    4. Serpientes sobre el césped… bajo el piano, por la alberca y en prisión

      El negocio de los cazadores de serpientes australianos cada vez va mejor, pues el periodo de aletargamiento de los reptiles se está reduciendo debido al aumento de la temperatura global.

      By NATASHA FROST and DAVID MAURICE SMITH

      March 16, 2024
    5. Was He Secretly Working for China? This Is What He Told Us.

      Di Sanh Duong openly said that some people might mistake him for a Chinese spy, but he maintained that he never did anything to hurt Australia.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      March 16, 2024
    6. Australia Wanted to Catch Chinese Spies. Is This Really Whom It Had in Mind?

      The first case tried under Australia’s foreign interference laws has raised tough questions about the breadth of the regulations.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      March 16, 2024
    7. Standing Up to China, Philippine Leader Courts New Network of Partners

      Escalating tensions in the South China Sea, President Ferdinand R. Marcos Jr. says, are not only a regional issue, but a global one.

      By SUI-LEE WEE and CAMILLE ELEMIA

      March 16, 2024
    8. TIMES INSIDER

      A Reporter With a Fear of Snakes Joins a Snake Catcher

      To write about the increase in snake encounters in Australia, a journalist had to get hands-on with the slithering reptiles.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 15, 2024
    9. Boeing Directs Airlines to Check Cockpit Seats on 787s After Latam Incident

      The sudden plunge of a Latam Airlines 787 Dreamliner this week might have been caused by a flight attendant hitting a switch on a cockpit seat.

      By SANTUL NERKAR and SYDNEY EMBER

      March 15, 2024
    10. McDonald’s Apologizes for ‘Global Technology Outage’ That Hit Japan, Australia and Elsewhere

      Customers had problems ordering at restaurants in several countries on Friday. Restaurants in Japan closed, while some in Australia reportedly reverted to using pen and paper.

      By NATASHA FROST, JOHN YOON and ISABELLA KWAI

      March 15, 2024
 
    1. LETTER 345

      Pets or Pests? How Australia Tackles its Two Cat Populations

      Experts say that since the overpopulation of both affects native wildlife similarly, the country should use the same strategies in managing them.

      By JULIA BERGIN

      March 15, 2024
    2. AUSTRALIA DISPATCH

      Snakes in the Grass — and Under the Piano, by the Pool and in the Prison

      Business is good for snake catchers in Australia, as the period of brumation, a sort of hibernation for reptiles, is shrinking — a result of the warming earth.

      By NATASHA FROST and DAVID MAURICE SMITH

      March 14, 2024
    3. Family Goes Missing After Heavy Rains Drench Western Australia

      Seven people, including four children, haven’t been seen in more than a day after 5.5 inches of rain in 24 hours led to floods and closed roads.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 12, 2024
    4. ‘Strong Movement’ on Flight to New Zealand Leaves Dozens Injured

      The airline, Latam, said a “technical problem” had caused the incident. Most of the injuries were minor, but one person was in serious condition.

      By YAN ZHUANG and NATASHA FROST

      March 11, 2024
    5. Scientists Discover 100 New Marine Species in New Zealand

      The findings, from the largely uncharted waters of Bounty Trough, show that “we’ve got a long way to go in terms of understanding where life is found in the ocean,” a researcher said.

      By REBECCA CARBALLO

      March 10, 2024
    6. LETTER 344

      A ‘Tipping Point’ for News in New Zealand

      “There was no single trigger that caused this,” James Gibbons, a regional executive at Warner Bros Discovery, said.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 7, 2024
    7. Taylor Swift se presenta en Singapur de forma exclusiva. Los vecinos de la región lo resienten

      El país pagó un acuerdo de exclusividad para que la estrella no se presente en ningún otro lugar del Sudeste Asiático. La decisión generó tensiones con Tailandia y Filipinas.

      By MIKE IVES, MUKTITA SUHARTONO and CAMILLE ELEMIA

      March 7, 2024
    8. Singapore Has Taylor Swift to Itself This Week, and the Neighbors Are Complaining

      The country is defending paying the pop star to play nowhere else in Southeast Asia. Thailand’s prime minister said the price was up to $3 million per show.

      By MIKE IVES, MUKTITA SUHARTONO and CAMILLE ELEMIA

      March 5, 2024
    9. More Screen Time Means Less Parent-Child Talk, Study Finds

      For each additional minute spent with an electronic device, toddlers said less, heard less and had fewer back-and-forth exchanges with adults.

      By EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

      March 4, 2024
    10. An Australian Watchmaker Creates His Own Path

      Reuben Schoots has been trying to build a business in a country that lacks a horological heritage. It hasn’t been easy, but he’s making progress.

      By MELANIE ABRAMS

      March 3, 2024
 
    1. Why More American Weapons Will Soon Be Made Outside America

      With the wars in Ukraine and Gaza straining U.S. arsenals, Washington is seeking to expand production with global partners like Australia.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      March 1, 2024
    2. LETTER 343

      Celebrating Classic Australian Picture Books

      Stories about distinctive wildlife, Aboriginal mythology and idyllic Australian childhoods.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 1, 2024
    3. Judge Awards $6.2 Million to New Zealand Volcano Victims

      Dozens of tourists and guides were killed or injured when a volcanic island erupted in 2019. The disaster was ruled to be a violation of New Zealand’s workplace safety rules.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Feb. 29, 2024
    4. Gas Pumps Didn’t Work in New Zealand. Blame the Leap Year.

      Dozens of unattended fuel stations across the country stopped working on Thursday for hours because of a software issue.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Feb. 29, 2024
    5. Police Officer Charged With Murdering Two Men in Australia

      The officer, Beaumont Lamarre-Condon, was charged Friday with killing Jesse Baird, 26, and Luke Davies, 29, who had been missing for more than a week and whose bodies were found on Tuesday.

      By CHRISTINE HAUSER and LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA

      Feb. 27, 2024
    6. LETTER 342

      The Regional Immigration Realities That Australia’s Politicians Overlook

      Immigrants can fill roles that are too often quickly vacated by Australians, but immigration roadblocks make becoming permanent employees impossible.

      By JULIA BERGIN

      Feb. 23, 2024
    7. An Olympic Equestrian Rode a Horse in a ‘Mankini.’ Australia Loves Him.

      Shane Rose was briefly barred from competition after he wore a G-string bikini costume. The stunt won wide public support.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Feb. 19, 2024
    8. Dozens Killed After Gunfight in Papua New Guinea

      The bloodshed in Enga Province, which has been plagued by violence between tribal groups, left at least 26 people dead, according to the authorities.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Feb. 18, 2024
    9. Asbestos Contamination Multiplies at Public Sites in Sydney

      Officials have found the toxic mineral at 34 sites, including schools and parks. The grounds outside a Taylor Swift concert venue tested negative.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Feb. 18, 2024
    10. THE SATURDAY PROFILE

      Architect Embraces Indigenous Worldview in Australian Designs

      Jefa Greenaway is a leading proponent of “Country-centered design,” which calls for collaboration with Indigenous communities and puts sustainability concerns at a project’s core.

      By WILL HIGGINBOTHAM

      Feb. 16, 2024
 
    1. LETTER 341

      In Melbourne, an Enchanting Hyperlocal Paper for the Digital Age

      The Paris End seeks to celebrate a recovering Australian city.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Feb. 15, 2024
    2. Tesla’s Chair Under Scrutiny for Oversight of Elon Musk

      Robyn Denholm, who has led the electric car company’s board for more than five years, has been criticized for not serving as a check on Mr. Musk.

      By NATASHA FROST and JACK EWING

      Feb. 15, 2024
    3. Australia introduce el derecho laboral a ‘desconectarse’

      Si se aprueba la legislación, las empresas podrían enfrentar multas por penalizar a los empleados que no respondan a comunicaciones relacionadas con el trabajo fuera del horario establecido.

      By NATASHA FROST and ISABELLA KWAI

      Feb. 12, 2024
    4. LETTER 340

      As Fears Rise, Some Australians Seek U.S.-China Détente

      Many countries are trying to figure out what to do about a more insecure, more nuclear-driven world. Australia has an idea.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      Feb. 8, 2024
    5. Australia Introduces Workers’ ‘Right to Disconnect’

      If the legislation passes, companies could face fines if they penalize employees for failing to respond to work-related communication in off-work hours.

      By NATASHA FROST and ISABELLA KWAI

      Feb. 8, 2024
    6. FICTION

      An Airborne Toxic Event Plagues an Aboriginal Town in This Novel

      “Praiseworthy,” Alexis Wright’s bracing satire of clashing worldviews in Australia, more than lives up to its name.

      By SAMUEL RUTTER

      Feb. 6, 2024
    7. Chinese-Australian Writer Held by China Given Suspended Death Sentence

      The verdict in the case of Yang Hengjun, who was detained on national security charges, may weigh on the warming relations between China and Australia.

      By NATASHA FROST, CHRIS BUCKLEY and AMY CHANG CHIEN

      Feb. 5, 2024
    8. At 73, Australia’s Most Important Aboriginal Writer Is Making Her Mark

      Alexis Wright, an Indigenous Australian author, writes epic novels in which many voices clamor to be heard.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Feb. 4, 2024
    9. LETTER 339

      In Australia and New Zealand, Barefoot Is a Way of Life

      A celebration of (at least occasional) shoelessness.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Feb. 3, 2024
    10. News Outlet Blames Photoshop for Making Australian Lawmaker’s Photo More Revealing

      9News apologized for the edited photo of the member of a state Parliament, Georgie Purcell, which it said was a result of “automation by Photoshop.”

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Jan. 31, 2024
 
    1. LETTER 338

      Indigenous Australians Plan to Go Bigger on Australia Day

      “Invasion Day is the reason why we’re all here today, but we must go beyond that,” one activist said.

      By JULIA BERGIN

      Jan. 25, 2024
    2. TRILOBITES

      The Sex-Obsessed Marsupials That Will Sleep When They’re Dead

      Scientists find that male antechinuses, rodent-like animals from Australia, will forgo sleep for sex during their breeding season, after which they die.

      By MIRIAM FAUZIA

      Jan. 25, 2024
    3. A Post on Gaza Leads to Turmoil at Australia’s Public Broadcaster

      The hiring and forced departure of a Lebanese Australian journalist has exposed long-simmering issues at one of the country’s most trusted institutions.

      By NATASHA FROST and DAMIEN CAVE

      Jan. 23, 2024
    4. What Is ‘Settler Colonialism’?

      A look at the academic roots of the idea, which has stirred fierce debate when applied to Israel.

      By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

      Jan. 22, 2024
    5. New Zealand Lawmaker Resigns After Shoplifting Allegations

      Golriz Ghahraman was the first refugee to be sworn in as a member of the country’s Parliament. She did not directly address the accusations but said her behavior “fell short.”

      By EMMA BUBOLA

      Jan. 16, 2024
    6. Indigenous Tourism Goes Deeper Than ‘Dinner and a Show’

      Around the globe, travelers are looking to get beyond superficial interactions with Native cultures for more in-depth experiences, like tours led by Indigenous guides and stays at Native-owned lodges.

      By MICHAEL HARMON

      Jan. 15, 2024
    7. Capping 5 Years of Speculation, Jacinda Ardern Gets Married

      New Zealand’s pathbreaking former prime minister became a global celebrity noted for, among other things, a very long engagement.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Jan. 13, 2024
    8. Papua New Guinea Leader Declares State of Emergency After Violent Riots

      There were signs the authorities had regained some control, but the extent of damage and casualties from the unrest remained unclear.

      By CHRISTOPHER COTTRELL

      Jan. 11, 2024
    9. Israel Adesanya, M.M.A. Star, Narrowly Avoids Drunk-Driving Conviction

      Within hours, the former middleweight mixed martial arts champion risked more legal trouble by posting provocative content on social media.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Jan. 11, 2024
    10. Papua New Guinea Orders Military to Restore Order as Unrest Rocks Capital

      Angry protests started after hundreds of police officers and other public servants appeared to walk off their jobs over a wage dispute.

      By CHRISTOPHER COTTRELL

      Jan. 10, 2024
 
    1. 52 Places to Go in 2024

      No matter why you travel, our list offers inspiration.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      Jan. 8, 2024
    2. Denmark’s Next Queen Is a Progressive, Common-Born Former Australian

      “I don’t recall wishing that one day I would be a princess,” Princess Mary told reporters. “I wanted to be a veterinarian.”

      By NATASHA FROST and MAYA TEKELI

      Jan. 3, 2024
    3. THE DISPATCHES OF 2023

      The World in Stories: 13 Favorite Dispatches From 2023

      Our correspondents ventured to some of the world’s most remote, and dangerous, locales to report stories that reveal a country’s culture and the human condition. Here are our favorites from the year.

      By BRYANT ROUSSEAU

      Dec. 31, 2023
    4. THE SATURDAY PROFILE

      The Year in People: Our 12 Favorite Saturday Profiles of 2023

      From a Nobel Peace Prize winner, to a mayor hunted by the Russians, to a poet whose muses are cats, our profiles featured people shaping the world around them, often under the radar.

      By BRYANT ROUSSEAU

      Dec. 29, 2023
    5. Bill Granger, Chef Who Brought Avocado Toast to the World, Dies at 54

      His breakfast cuisine catapulted Australian cafe culture to international acclaim, although some saw his best-known dish as an example of millennial excess.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 28, 2023
    6. Storms in Australia Leave at Least 9 Dead

      Extreme weather in the eastern states of Queensland and Victoria this week knocked out power for tens of thousands of residents, the authorities said.

      By MIKE IVES

      Dec. 27, 2023
    7. Freed From Never-Ending Detention, They Ended Up in Another Limbo

      An Australian high court allowed the release of dozens of detained people who are now subject to curfews and monitored by the government with ankle bracelets.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 24, 2023
    8. The Sydney Hobart Yacht Race Has a Boat-Size Absence

      Wild Oats XI, a crowd favorite that is one of the most successful yachts in the event’s history, will not compete this year pending repairs and rethinking.

      By KIMBALL LIVINGSTON

      Dec. 23, 2023
    9. At the Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, Women Are Making Their Mark

      The event is attracting more female skippers than in previous years, and many own the boats.

      By DAVID SCHMIDT

      Dec. 23, 2023
    10. Airbnb to Pay About $20 Million After Charging Australians in U.S. Dollars

      Airbnb admitted in Australian court that it had made “false or misleading representations,” charging customers in U.S. currency instead of Australian dollars.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      Dec. 20, 2023
 
    1. Inland From Bondi Beach, ‘Heat Islands’ Make Australia’s Summer Deadlier

      Just a few miles west of some of the country’s most iconic beaches, densely built Sydney suburbs are amplifying the dangers of climate change.

      By GAVIN BUTLER and MATTHEW ABBOTT

      Dec. 20, 2023
    2. Tasmania Falls for Neil the Seal, a 1,000-Pound Beach Bum

      He basks in parking spaces, frolics with traffic cones and generally makes himself at home. But the authorities are worried about the risks of too much time among humans.

      By LIVIA ALBECK-RIPKA

      Dec. 19, 2023
    3. In Rightward Shift, New Zealand Reconsiders Pro-Maori Policies

      The nation has long been lauded for trying to do right by its Indigenous people, but a new government may force a reckoning of Māori affairs.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 16, 2023
    4. LETTER 337

      Stories About Wonder, Fireworks and Vegemite

      Twelve months of counterprogramming from the Australia bureau.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 14, 2023
    5. Australian Court Tosses Conviction of Mother Accused of Killing Her 4 Children

      Kathleen Folbigg, who spent years in prison, was pardoned in June, after an inquiry found that her children had most likely died of natural causes.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 13, 2023
    6. Australia’s First Cyclone of Season Nears Amid Rash of Extreme Weather

      The storm is part of a stretch of wild weather the continent has been experiencing, which includes heat waves, fires and floods.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Dec. 12, 2023
    7. A World Map With No National Borders and 1,642 Animals

      Anton Thomas, a New Zealander in Melbourne, Australia, has given three years of his life to a hand-drawn map of our planet and its animal inhabitants.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 10, 2023
    8. LETTER 336

      Waltzing Matilda

      A farewell, of sorts.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Dec. 9, 2023
    9. With Its Fourth Rugby World Championship, South Africa Stands Alone

      Ireland and France entered the World Cup as favorites, but South Africa won it by beating New Zealand in a meeting of the sport’s traditional champions.

      By PETE MCKENZIE

      Dec. 8, 2023
    10. THE SATURDAY PROFILE

      A Measured Voice for Change Must Now Decide How to Follow Defeat

      Thomas Mayo was the calm champion of the effort in Australia to give Indigenous people a voice in Parliament. After its failure, will he turn up the volume?

      By DAMIEN CAVE and ADAM FERGUSON

      Dec. 8, 2023
    11. Arizona Man Is Arrested in Connection With Australia Shooting

      Two police officers and a bystander died in the shootout in Queensland last year.

      By YAN ZHUANG and CHRISTINE HAUSER

      Dec. 6, 2023
    12. After Decades of Decline, a Feathered Icon Breeds in New Zealand’s Capital

      The national bird, the kiwi, has hatched eggs in the wild in the Wellington area for the first time in living memory, thanks to a multiyear conservation effort.

      By PETE MCKENZIE

      Dec. 4, 2023
    13. Gambling, Risky Pranks and Lucrative Contracts: Inside the Streaming Site Kick

      The Twitch competitor has doled out generous deals to content creators. It has also faced criticism for its lax moderation and embrace of online gambling.

      By KELLEN BROWNING

      Dec. 2, 2023
    14. Police Cast a Dragnet for 10,000 Stolen Doughnuts

      A woman thought she was stealing a van. She got thousands of doughnuts as well.

      By VICTOR MATHER

      Dec. 1, 2023
    15. LETTER 335

      A Back Door to Taylor Swift’s Australia Tickets? Not if You’re in Australia.

      An online reseller has skirted the country’s restrictions on ticket sales, allowing Swifties elsewhere to buy admission to the star’s Eras Tour.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Dec. 1, 2023
    16. 36 HOURS

      36 Hours in Melbourne, Australia

      Visitors willing to explore the alleyways of this arts- and food-loving city will find gems at every turn.

      By TACEY RYCHTER

      Nov. 30, 2023
    17. Rare Giant Rat Is Photographed Alive for First Time

      The people who live on the island of Vangunu were adamant that the critically endangered species still existed. They helped researchers prove that they were right.

      By REBECCA CARBALLO

      Nov. 29, 2023
    18. New Zealand’s New Government Says It Will Scrap Smoking Ban

      The law, celebrated as a model for other countries, would have eventually made tobacco illegal.

      By MIKE IVES and NATASHA FROST

      Nov. 28, 2023
    19. In New Zealand’s Crackdown on Crime, What Part Can Maori Wardens Play?

      The strategies used by the Indigenous community policing alternative are in stark contrast to more muscular tactics pitched by the incoming government.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Nov. 28, 2023
    20. Monday Briefing: A 3rd Hamas-Israel Exchange

      Plus an unusual mental health plan in Africa.

      By JUSTIN PORTER

      Nov. 26, 2023
    21. Fire Season in Australia Starts, Early and Ominous

      Though experts do not think that this season will be the worst yet, they also warn that the past is no longer a reliable guide to the future.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Nov. 26, 2023
    22. LETTER 334

      Cheers for Cricket

      How sports can dissolve boundaries.

      By VIVEK SHANKAR

      Nov. 24, 2023
    23. TIMESVIDEO

      Firefighters Battle Blazes in Australia

      Helicopters help douse flames in Perth as Western Australia deals with a heat wave.

      By ABC AUSTRALIA

      Nov. 24, 2023
    24. El tenis lo era todo para ellos. Ahora es la razón de su dolor

      La muerte de una hija y los problemas de otra han dejado a una conocida familia del tenis de Nueva Zelanda dudando de sus decisiones y su relación con el juego que alguna vez amaron.

      By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN

      Nov. 21, 2023
    25. LETTER 333

      Celebrity Campaign Shines Spotlight on New Zealand Bird Contest

      An endorsement from the comedian John Oliver led to a spike in votes for the eventual winner, the pūteketeke.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Nov. 17, 2023
    26. How One Family’s Pursuit of Tennis Success Ended in Heartache

      The death of one daughter and the struggles of another have left a prominent New Zealand tennis family questioning their choices and their relationship with the game they once loved.

      By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN

      Nov. 16, 2023
    27. AUSTRALIA DISPATCH

      The Corner Lot Where All the World’s Vegemite Comes From

      First concocted a century ago, the spread is widely adored by Australians — and loathed by almost everyone else.

      By NATASHA FROST and ABIGAIL VARNEY

      Nov. 12, 2023
    28. No, 11,200 Climate Refugees Aren’t Heading to Australia

      Low-lying Tuvalu has reached a deal with its large Pacific neighbor to address the challenge of rising oceans, but it is not planning to pack up and go.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Nov. 11, 2023
    29. LETTER 332

      Crocodile Bites Man. Man Bites Back.

      A surprising tale of Northern Territory chutzpah.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Nov. 9, 2023
    30. Antisemitic and Islamophobic Incidents Surge in Australia

      Tensions between religious groups in Australia have risen since the start of the Israel-Hamas war.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Nov. 6, 2023
    31. Garth Barfoot, 87, Is the Oldest Runner in the New York City Marathon

      Barfoot, of New Zealand, says he has run dozens of marathons, but this is his first time running New York’s.

      By NADAV GAVRIELOV

      Nov. 5, 2023
    32. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Why China and Australia Are Reconciling. Sort of.

      Both sides have been cautious in the run-up to Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s trip to Beijing, avoiding terms like “reset” in favor of “stabilization.”

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      Nov. 3, 2023
    33. New Zealand Is Becoming a First Choice for Second Homes

      The developer Jim Rohrstaff discusses the connection between golf and waterfront real estate.

      By MICHAEL CROLEY

      Nov. 3, 2023
    34. LETTER 331

      As Cars Have Grown Bigger, Parking Spaces Might, Too

      Australians are grumbling about a recent invasion of American-style giant pickup trucks. But even before that, vehicle sizes were increasing.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Nov. 2, 2023
    35. Olympic Hopefuls Needed a Home. A Retirement Community Stepped Up.

      New Zealand’s curling team wanted to train with the “big boys” in Canada, and a group of enthusiastic seniors has provided housing, a cheering section and lots of advice.

      By SCOTT CACCIOLA

      Nov. 2, 2023
    36. Woman Charged With Murder in Suspected Mushroom Poisoning Case

      In a case that has gripped Australia, three people fell ill and died soon after eating lunch at the home of a relative.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Nov. 2, 2023
    37. Saudi Arabia Confirmed as Sole Bidder for 2034 World Cup

      Australia announced it would not bid, clearing the way for the Saudis to bring soccer’s biggest tournament back to the Gulf.

      By TARIQ PANJA

      Oct. 31, 2023
    38. New Zealand Volcano Owner Is Found Guilty of Safety Failure

      The ruling brings an end to legal proceedings that began after the White Island eruption killed 22 people in 2019.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Oct. 31, 2023
    39. Stereo Speaker Battles Blare Celine Dion Tunes and Torment a New Zealand City

      A subculture has developed among Pacific Islander communities based on who can blast music — often Ms. Dion’s songs — the loudest. Some call it too disruptive.

      By MIKE IVES

      Oct. 27, 2023
    40. LETTER 330

      How Are You Preparing for a Summer of Fires?

      As El Niño arrives, heralding dry weather, it feels like the whole country is on edge. We’d like to hear from readers in Australia.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Oct. 27, 2023
    41. As Violence Surges, Nations Seek U.S. Defense Pacts. Some Americans Are Wary.

      Many countries, including Ukraine and Israel, want greater U.S. protection against Russia, China, Iran and North Korea. But some Americans resist further military commitments.

      By EDWARD WONG

      Oct. 26, 2023
    42. CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK

      At the Australian State Dinner, Jill Biden Stays Neutral

      The first lady wore a dress by designer Reem Acra.

      By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

      Oct. 26, 2023
    43. THE SCENE

      Biden Keeps Australia’s Dinner Low-Key at a Moment of Global Turmoil

      Before the state dinner was over, President Biden had stepped out for a briefing on a mass shooting in Maine and to call lawmakers in the state. He left shortly after 10 p.m.

      By KATIE ROGERS

      Oct. 25, 2023
    44. The Full Guest List for Biden’s State Dinner With Australia

      The Bidens invited more than 300 guests, including business leaders, musicians, athletes and prominent Australian Americans.

      By CHRIS CAMERON

      Oct. 25, 2023
    45. Carnival Was Negligent in Covid Outbreak on Cruise Ship, Court Rules

      An Australian judge found that the cruise company and a subsidiary “breached their duty of care” in handling a coronavirus outbreak on the Ruby Princess in March 2020.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      Oct. 25, 2023
    46. Biden Reaffirms Support for Israel but Calls for Protection of Civilians

      During an appearance with the Australian prime minister, President Biden pledged that the United States would provide Israel with what it needed to defend itself against Hamas.

      By KATIE ROGERS

      Oct. 25, 2023
    47. A Fall-Themed Menu for Australia’s State Dinner

      Because of what the first lady called “tumultuous times,” the White House canceled a plan to have the B-52s perform, inviting the musicians as guests instead. Root vegetables will be featured at the table.

      By THE NEW YORK TIMES

      Oct. 24, 2023
    48. On the Agenda for Australia’s State Visit: China, Trade and a U.S. Marine Band

      President Biden will welcome Anthony Albanese, the prime minister of Australia, for meetings and a state dinner in Washington.

      By KATIE ROGERS

      Oct. 24, 2023
    49. Monday Briefing: Israel Orders More Evacuations

      Plus part one of our series, India’s Daughters.

      By JUSTIN PORTER

      Oct. 22, 2023
    50. A President, a Billionaire and Questions About Access and National Security

      Anthony Pratt, one of Australia’s wealthiest men, made his way into Donald Trump’s inner circle with money and flattery. What he heard there has become of interest to federal prosecutors.

      By BEN PROTESS, JONATHAN SWAN, MAGGIE HABERMAN and ALAN FEUER

      Oct. 22, 2023
    51. Australia Says China Is Poised to Lift Punishing Wine Tariffs

      Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said he would visit China and meet with Xi Jinping, another sign of a thaw in the countries’ once-icy relations.

      By TIFFANY MAY

      Oct. 22, 2023
    52. NEWS ANALYSIS

      After Bruising Vote, Indigenous Australians Say ‘Reconciliation Is Dead’

      The rejection of the Indigenous Voice to Parliament is likely to lead to an irreversible shift in the nation’s relationship with its first peoples.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Oct. 21, 2023
    53. LETTER 329

      The Most Australian Story to Ever Come Out of Vietnam

      Hotels hold secrets, and some of them are a little stranger than others.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      Oct. 20, 2023
    54. Monday Briefing: A Race to Ease the Gaza Crisis

      Plus the myths that sex experts wish would vanish.

      By JUSTIN PORTER

      Oct. 15, 2023
    55. Australia Fines X for Not Providing Information on Child Abuse Content

      The service formerly known as Twitter told Australian regulators that its automated detection of abusive material had declined after Elon Musk bought it.

      By KATE CONGER

      Oct. 15, 2023
    56. New Zealand Elects Its Most Conservative Government in Decades

      The rightward shift came as voters punished the party once led by Jacinda Ardern for failing to deliver the transformational change that it had promised.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Oct. 14, 2023
    57. Crushing Indigenous Hopes, Australia Rejects ‘Voice’ Referendum

      The proposed Indigenous Voice to Parliament was widely supported by Indigenous voters, but had raised fears and hopes that were both overblown.

      By YAN ZHUANG and TAMATI SMITH

      Oct. 13, 2023
    58. LETTER 328

      Why Are There So Many Jacintas?

      The relatively uncommon name of Jacinta or Jacinda is shared among many famous people in New Zealand and Australia, with most of them born in the 1970s.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Oct. 12, 2023
    59. Friday Briefing: The U.N. Warns of Disaster in Gaza

      Plus a new comic book universe.

      By JUSTIN PORTER

      Oct. 12, 2023
    60. What to Know About the New Zealand Election

      Voters head to the polls this weekend in an election that is likely to show a rightward and populist shift in the country’s politics.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Oct. 12, 2023
    61. Ask New Zealand’s Maori Party What They’re Wearing. They Dare You.

      Politicians typically swat away questions about their appearance, but Te Pati Maori has wielded fashion as a political weapon.

      By SERENA SOLOMON

      Oct. 12, 2023
    62. Should Aboriginal Australians Have a ‘Voice’ in Parliament? These Two Say No.

      Two female Aboriginal lawmakers with very different political views are campaigning against the proposal to create an advisory body on Indigenous issues.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Oct. 11, 2023
    63. China Releases Australian Journalist Three Years After Arrest

      Cheng Lei, a host for China’s international broadcaster, was arrested in Beijing at a time of rising tensions with Australia. Her release signals a warming.

      By ALEXANDRA STEVENSON

      Oct. 11, 2023
    64. A Master Anatomist of Ordinary People in Difficult Times

      With the republication of “The Children’s Bach,” a 1984 novel, and “This House of Grief,” a 2014 account of a murder trial, the Australian writer Helen Garner is ripe for discovery by American readers.

      By DAPHNE MERKIN

      Oct. 10, 2023
    65. A Polarized Australia Confronts ‘Trump Style Misinformation’

      The reverberations from election conspiracy theories, until recently the domain of political fringes, could be acute, as witnessed by the United States and Brazil.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Oct. 7, 2023
    66. LETTER 327

      How Aligning With China Changed Life in the Solomon Islands

      The author of a new book on the diplomatic switch says that ending recognition of Taiwan affected life in unexpected ways across the island nation.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Oct. 6, 2023
    67. Trump Said to Have Revealed Nuclear Submarine Secrets to Australian Businessman

      Soon after leaving office, the former president shared sensitive information about American submarines with a billionaire member of Mar-a-Lago, according to people familiar with the matter.

      By ALAN FEUER, BEN PROTESS, MAGGIE HABERMAN and JONATHAN SWAN

      Oct. 5, 2023
    68. THE NEW NEW WORLD

      China Is Suffering a Brain Drain. The U.S. Isn’t Exploiting It.

      China’s brightest minds, including tech professionals, are emigrating, but many are not heading to America. We spoke to them to ask why.

      By LI YUAN

      Oct. 3, 2023
    69. Should Children Join the Killing in New Zealand’s War on Invasive Species?

      A hunting contest has exposed tensions over which animals deserve protection, who gets to define humaneness and how children should be taught about conservation.

      By YAN ZHUANG and TATSIANA CHYPSANAVA

      Oct. 1, 2023
    70. TIMESVIDEO

      Dozens Injured After Bombing in Pakistan

      More than 50 people were killed in a suicide attack in Mastung, a district in southwestern Pakistan.

      By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS and REUTERS

      Sept. 29, 2023
    71. LETTER 326

      Why Doesn’t Australia Have Better Trains?

      And a glimmer of high-speed hope.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 29, 2023
    72. Overlooked No More: Alice Anderson, Who Ran Australia’s First All-Woman Garage

      Her car repair business was described as having a staff “capable of doing the jobs any male member of the automobile industry would undertake.”

      By BRIOHNY DOYLE

      Sept. 26, 2023
    73. TRILOBITES

      Satellites Show Mysterious Fairy Circles in More Parts of the World

      Researchers say that the rings of vegetation, which had mostly been studied in Namibia and Australia, may exist in 15 countries.

      By RACHEL NUWER

      Sept. 26, 2023
    74. Biden Hosts Pacific Islands, With a Rising China in Mind

      The event at the White House was part of an administration effort to deepen ties with a string of small but strategic nations.

      By MICHAEL CROWLEY

      Sept. 25, 2023
    75. TRILOBITES

      ¿Cómo consiguieron su color los diamantes rosas de Australia?

      Investigadores australianos dijeron que las coloridas gemas de la mina Argyle, que produjo más del 90 por ciento de las piedras rosas del mundo, pueden haber surgido cuando un supercontinente se dividió.

      By MAYA WEI-HAAS

      Sept. 23, 2023
    76. How a Storied National Airline Became Reviled in Its Own Country

      A string of scandals has left Qantas Airways, which calls itself “the spirit of Australia,” near the bottom of public opinion at home.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 23, 2023
    77. LETTER 325

      Australia Revisits What Worked, and Didn’t, in the Pandemic

      An inquiry will try to draw lessons from the government response, but some question whether it will go far enough.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Sept. 22, 2023
    78. After Jacinda Ardern, a ‘Scary Time’ for Women in New Zealand Politics

      Three years after Ms. Ardern won a resounding victory for her Labour Party, the nation will vote in a very different political landscape.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 22, 2023
    79. The Spotlight Shines on the Rugby World Cup in France

      French fans have packed out stadiums, the Place de la Concorde and other venues to show their support for rugby in a land where soccer rules.

      By JAMES HILL and VICTOR MATHER

      Sept. 21, 2023
    80. As a National Favorite Fumbles, New Zealand Falls for Another Rugby Team

      An improbable run by the New Zealand Warriors has offered some excitement to counter the All Blacks’ recent misfortune.

      By PETE MCKENZIE

      Sept. 20, 2023
    81. The Essential J.M. Coetzee

      His spare, icily precise books explore humanity’s most serious themes, including South Africa’s legacy of apartheid. And not all of them are downers.

      By JASON FARAGO

      Sept. 19, 2023
    82. TRILOBITES

      Pink Diamonds Emerged Out of One of Earth’s Most Ancient Breakups

      Australian researchers said the colorful gems of the Argyle mine, which produced more than 90 percent of the world’s pink stones, may have erupted when a supercontinent split.

      By MAYA WEI-HAAS

      Sept. 19, 2023
    83. As El Niño Arrives, Australian Region Sees ‘Catastrophic’ Fire Conditions

      The authorities ordered school closures on the south coast of New South Wales, where springtime temperatures were expected to near 100 degrees.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Sept. 19, 2023
    84. When Fiji Beats Australia, and It Almost Isn’t an Upset

      The Pacific Island nations, hardly sports powers, can hold their own and then some in rugby.

      By VICTOR MATHER

      Sept. 18, 2023
    85. LETTER 324

      Previewing a Spring of Culture in Australia

      Offerings in art, culture, design, music and theater across the country.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 15, 2023
    86. TRILOBITES

      SpongeBob Lives in a Pineapple. These Sharks Live in Sponges.

      Researchers were not engaged in nautical nonsense when they discovered that a small shark species inhabits the absorbent and porous animals.

      By DARREN INCORVAIA

      Sept. 14, 2023
    87. Meet a 25-Million-Year-Old Koala You Could Cuddle Like a Cat

      The discovery of a fossil hints at the existence of an animal that researchers say could be the missing link in the understanding of evolution of marsupials in Australia.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 12, 2023
    88. TRILOBITES

      Sharks on a Golf Course Made a Watery Grave Unlike Any Other

      A group of bull sharks ended up spending 17 years in a lake by a golf course’s 14th hole, suggesting that the predators can live in low-saltwater environments indefinitely.

      By ANNIE ROTH

      Sept. 12, 2023
    89. Island Nations Hope for Court’s Help on Climate’s Effects

      A tribunal is expected to issue an advisory opinion on behalf of Pacific and Caribbean countries on whether greenhouse gases are pollutants that violate international law.

      By MARLISE SIMONS

      Sept. 11, 2023
    90. LETTER 323

      Culling, Curfews and Caps: Australia ‘Declares War’ on Its Cat Problem

      Feral cats have long been recognized as a major threat to the continent’s native wildlife. But now the government is also exploring ways to rein in domestic cats.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Sept. 8, 2023
    91. Hundreds Halt Work at Energy Plants in Australia

      The labor action at liquefied natural gas plants, responsible for about 6 percent of the world’s supply of the fuel, came as talks over pay and work conditions stalled.

      By YAN ZHUANG and STANLEY REED

      Sept. 8, 2023
    92. Australian Punters Are Putting a New Spin on Football

      The tricky curves and crafty bounces of their kicks, honed by Australian football and rugby, have changed the way punt returners are coached.

      By JERÉ LONGMAN

      Sept. 7, 2023
    93. Caught Between China and the West, a Pacific Island Nation Ousts Its Leader

      The prime minister of Vanuatu lost his job after he was criticized for veering too close to the West. He accuses his successor of being too cozy with China.

      By NATASHA FROST and CHRISTOPHER COTTRELL

      Sept. 5, 2023
    94. After Mass Killing of Trees on a Wealthy Waterfront, a Theory Takes Hold

      The brazen culling of more than 250 trees at a waterside reserve in Australia, the speculation goes, had the goal of producing a better view.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Sept. 5, 2023
    95. Perilous, Icy Mission Rescues Sick Worker in Antarctica

      It took an icebreaker ship and two long-range helicopters to evacuate the staff member from an Australian research base to advanced medical care.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Sept. 4, 2023
    96. New Zealand Is Trying to Shake Off Its Losses

      After a period of uncharacteristic losing, the All Blacks, international rugby’s most successful team, has strung together some important wins in time for the World Cup.

      By PETE MCKENZIE

      Sept. 2, 2023
    97. Airline Sold Tickets for Already Canceled Flights, Watchdog Group Says

      Australia’s consumer commission said in legal proceedings that Qantas, the country’s national carrier, had sold tickets for routes it never intended to fly.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Sept. 1, 2023
    98. LETTER 322

      Could Australia and New Zealand Become One Nation?

      A New Zealand lawmaker talked about the idea last week, though a union is unlikely ever to take place.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 31, 2023
    99. Will a Bitterly Divided Australia Elevate the Voice of Aboriginal People?

      A referendum to set up an Indigenous advisory body in Parliament was envisioned as uniting the country. The opposite has happened.

      By YAN ZHUANG and NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 29, 2023
    100. She Was Depressed and Forgetful. It Was the Worm in Her Brain.

      Doctors in Australia found a three-inch live parasitic worm in a woman’s brain during surgery after they spent more than a year trying to find the cause of her distress.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      Aug. 29, 2023
    101. Three U.S. Marines Die in Air Crash in Australia

      An Osprey aircraft with 23 people on board crashed during a joint training exercise near Darwin, in the north of Australia. Several others were seriously injured.

      By YAN ZHUANG and DAMIEN CAVE

      Aug. 27, 2023
    102. Las futbolistas de la selección española se niegan a jugar hasta que dimita Rubiales

      Las jugadoras exigieron un cambio después de que el presidente de la federación española de fútbol se negó a renunciar por besar a Jennifer Hermoso, integrante del equipo ganador de la Copa del Mundo.

      By RACHEL CHAUNDLER

      Aug. 25, 2023
    103. LETTER 321

      How an Aboriginal ‘Voice to Parliament’ Could Be Australia’s Brexit Moment

      Longtime racial tensions are hindering a push to add an advisory body for Indigenous people’s issues to the Constitution, an Aboriginal activist says.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 25, 2023
    104. Spanish Women’s Squad Refuses to Play Until Soccer Chief Resigns

      The players demanded change after Luis Rubiales declined to quit over kissing Jennifer Hermoso, a member of the World Cup-winning team.

      By RACHEL CHAUNDLER

      Aug. 25, 2023
    105. Ex-Principal of Australian Girls’ School Sentenced to 15 Years for Abuse

      Malka Leifer, extradited from Israel after a lengthy process, was found guilty in April of sexually abusing two students decades earlier.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 24, 2023
    106. TRILOBITES

      The Quest for a Crocodile Dictionary

      Crocodiles may be the most vocal reptiles out there, and scientists think learning what they say to one another could help us understand them better.

      By ANTHONY HAM

      Aug. 24, 2023
    107. In the Heart of the Outback, Safeguarding a Sacred Land

      On a road trip in central Australia, a visitor learns how Indigenous custodians and conservationists are working to protect an ancient land and its animal denizens.

      By ANTHONY HAM

      Aug. 23, 2023
    108. Tom Courtney, Runner Who Lunged to Grab Olympic Gold, Dies at 90

      In 1956 in Melbourne, he was dueling with another American when an English runner burst toward the finish line. But Courtney had one last surge in him.

      By FRANK LITSKY

      Aug. 22, 2023
    109. Lachlan Murdoch Pays $840,000 to Site He Had Accused of Libel

      Mr. Murdoch, the C.E.O. of Fox Corporation, abandoned his lawsuit against the news outlet Crikey in April. The payment covers the publication’s legal costs.

      By KATIE ROBERTSON

      Aug. 22, 2023
    110. Where Her Father Became a Hero, Caroline Kennedy Redefines Diplomacy

      Ms. Kennedy’s recent swim in the Pacific waters where J.F.K. survived a wartime ordeal shows how her family legacy informs her work.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      Aug. 21, 2023
    111. Un torneo de fútbol en el interior de Australia busca generar esperanza

      En los pueblos australianos situados a miles de kilómetros del estadio del Mundial Femenino de Fútbol más cercano, los líderes indígenas esperan que este deporte pueda ofrecer esperanza y oportunidades.

      By JENNY VRENTAS and ISABELLA MOORE

      Aug. 20, 2023
    112. Wanted: Female Athletes. Multiple Vacancies.

      Australia’s major sports need talent to stock their women’s leagues. They are all looking at the same athletes.

      By RORY SMITH

      Aug. 19, 2023
    113. TIMES INSIDER

      One Long Reporting Trip Around the World

      Sports have always been my ticket to travel: to a surf spot above the Arctic Circle, to a volcano in Mexico and to soccer games in New Zealand.

      By JERÉ LONGMAN

      Aug. 19, 2023
    114. John Devitt, 86, Champion Swimmer With a Tarnished Gold Medal, Dies

      He won two Olympic gold medals for Australia, but the second was awarded after a disputed finish — one of the more freakish moments in sports history.

      By FRANK LITSKY

      Aug. 18, 2023
    115. LETTER 320

      Up the Matildas!

      Australia’s national women’s soccer team have walked away with the nation’s hearts clasped firmly in their hands.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 18, 2023
    116. Australia Loved the Matildas. Will It Continue to Love Women’s Sports?

      Australian fans are mourning their team’s semifinal defeat at the Women’s World Cup. Beyond the ache, there are concerns about whether the support for women’s sports will last.

      By JENNY VRENTAS

      Aug. 17, 2023
    117. 6 Are Rescued 36 Hours After Tourist Boat Capsizes Off Indonesia

      Four Australian tourists and two members of their boat’s Indonesian crew were found after an extensive search off the coast of North Sumatra, Indonesia. A third crew member is still missing.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 17, 2023
    118. Megachurch Founder Acquitted of Hiding Sexual Abuse Committed by His Father

      Brian Houston, who once led Hillsong, was charged because he did not inform the police after his father admitted in 1999 to sexually assaulting a young boy decades before.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 17, 2023
    119. Thursday Briefing: China’s Stock Market Slump

      Plus, a new Holocaust museum opened in a video game.

      By JUSTIN PORTER

      Aug. 16, 2023
    120. Kerr Scored. The Crowd Roared. But England Wasn’t Done.

      England advanced to its first World Cup final by leaning on the experience and the resilience of a champion.

      By JENNY VRENTAS

      Aug. 16, 2023
    121. ENGLAND 3, AUSTRALIA 1

      A Dream Ending for England, a Dream Denied for Australia

      Answering Sam Kerr’s tying goal with two of its own, England advanced to an all-European Women’s World Cup final against Spain.

      By RORY SMITH

      Aug. 16, 2023
    122. Australia’s Matildas Unite a Nation and Crack the Code Wars

      The World Cup has added a new dimension to a national sporting conversation often dominated by the rivalry between rugby and Australian rules football.

      By RORY SMITH

      Aug. 15, 2023
    123. A World Away From the World Cup, Soccer With a Different Goal

      In dusty Australian towns a thousand miles from the nearest Women’s World Cup stadium, Indigenous leaders hope the sport can offer hope, and opportunity.

      By JENNY VRENTAS and ISABELLA MOORE

      Aug. 15, 2023
    124. Australia Outlasts France on Penalties, and the Host Nation Exhales

      Australia needed 10 rounds of penalty kicks to confirm its place in the team’s first semifinal, and extend its country’s wild ride.

      By RORY SMITH

      Aug. 12, 2023
    125. LETTER 319

      What Another Trump Presidency Could Mean for Australia

      The author of a new book exploring that possibility says it would raise existential questions about the current alliance with America, with huge implications for Australia’s regional and global standing.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 11, 2023
    126. Rodriguez, Singer Whose Career Was Resurrected, Dies at 81

      Two albums in the early 1970s went largely unnoticed in the United States, but not overseas. Then came the 2012 documentary “Searching for Sugar Man.”

      By NEIL GENZLINGER

      Aug. 9, 2023
    127. 98 Arrests in Child Abuse Inquiry That Followed Killing of F.B.I. Agents

      The investigation the two agents were part of grew into a larger inquiry that netted members of an online pedophile ring in the U.S. and Australia.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 9, 2023
    128. 3 Deaths, and a Host of Questions, After a Family Lunch in Australia

      The three guests, and a fourth who fell ill, had symptoms consistent with mushroom poisoning, the police say. The woman who served the meal has been questioned by the police.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      Aug. 9, 2023
    129. World Cup Picks Up Baton for Women’s Sports in Australia

      For as long as there have been sports in Australia, women have clamored to play and participate. But winning visibility, and support, has been a long road.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 5, 2023
    130. LETTER 318

      Australians’ ‘Golden Ticket’ to the U.S.

      Proposed changes to the E-3 visa have worried some expatriates.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 3, 2023
    131. Australia Will Return Looted Sculptures to Cambodia

      A centuries-old Buddhist sculpture was taken from a rural area in Cambodia nearly 30 years ago. It was later sold with two other statues to the National Gallery of Australia.

      By NATASHA FROST

      Aug. 3, 2023
    132. David Hallberg’s New Job: Decision Maker

      The former American Ballet Theater star now leads the Australian Ballet. “When I am faced with difficulties, I lean into them,” he said.

      By ROSLYN SULCAS

      Aug. 1, 2023
    133. 6 Great Space Images From July

      A star with two faces, boulders cast into the void, space junk on a beach and more out of this world scenes.

      By MICHAEL ROSTON

      July 31, 2023
    134. Object Found on Australian Beach Is a Mystery No More

      A cylindrical object that was found in remote Western Australia probably came from an Indian rocket, Australia’s space agency said.

      By CLAIRE MOSES

      July 31, 2023
    135. Australia to Fast-Track Missile Production for U.S. Exports

      The announcement of this plan, along with steps to expand joint military exercises, was shadowed by the news of a helicopter crash during one such exercise.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      July 28, 2023
    136. Australian TV Deal Has World Cup Viewers Asking: Where Are the Games?

      When FIFA sold Australia’s World Cup broadcast rights to a streaming service, it made it harder for casual fans to find the matches.

      By TARIQ PANJA

      July 28, 2023
    137. Quantum Tech Will Transform National Security. It’s Testing U.S. Alliances Now.

      A global race to harness the power of atoms for navigation, computing and encryption is pitting concerns over protectionism against the spirit of cooperation.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      July 28, 2023
    138. LETTER 317

      The State of Women’s Soccer

      The largest-ever Women’s World Cup tournament highlights the growing professionalization of the sport. A sportswriter shares his thoughts.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      July 28, 2023
    139. Colonization Was the ‘Luckiest Thing’ to Happen to Australia, Ex-Leader Says

      The backlash was swift after John Howard made the remarks ahead of a referendum on Aboriginal representation in the government.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 26, 2023
    140. The Whales Gathered in a Heart Shape. Experts Feared What Would Come Next.

      A pod of nearly 100 pilot whales displayed unusual behavior before beaching themselves in Australia. More than 50 died, and the rest were later euthanized.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      July 26, 2023
    141. LETTER 316

      Why Do Australian Politicians Love Nicknames?

      To the average voter, ScoMo might sound more comfortable than “Prime Minister Morrison.”

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 21, 2023
    142. New Zealand’s Fruit-Rich Ice Cream Gets a Sugary American Makeover

      The wholesome summer favorite is catching on in the U.S., but with sprinkles, drizzles and even cookies to satisfy the nation’s sweet tooth.

      By PRIYA KRISHNA

      July 20, 2023
    143. Your Thursday Briefing

      China pushes back against U.S. climate pressure.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      July 20, 2023
    144. ON SOCCER

      Australia’s New Queen

      Sam Kerr is the face of the World Cup. She has the weight of a nation on her shoulders. She does not seem to have noticed.

      By RORY SMITH

      July 19, 2023
    145. TIMESVIDEO

      Deadly Shooting in Auckland Before Women’s World Cup

      Prime Minister Chris Hipkins of New Zealand said that there was no national security risk after the shooting and that the games would proceed as planned.

      By REUTERS

      July 19, 2023
    146. Women’s World Cup 2023: How New Zealand Can Advance to the Round of 16

      How New Zealand can qualify for the next round of the 2023 World Cup.

       
      July 19, 2023
    147. Women’s World Cup 2023: How Australia Can Advance to the Round of 16

      How Australia can qualify for the next round of the 2023 World Cup.

       
      July 19, 2023
    148. TIMES INSIDER

      Reporting in Yiddish, Without Speaking Yiddish

      In an Australian community working to preserve its identity, a journalist found subjects with plenty of questions for her.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 19, 2023
    149. TIMESVIDEO

      Sailor and His Dog Survive Three Months Lost at Sea

      An Australian man who had set sail from Mexico bound for French Polynesia was rescued after a helicopter spotted his badly damaged catamaran drifting in the Pacific Ocean.

      By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

      July 18, 2023
    150. Australian Man and His Dog Rescued After Nearly 3 Months at Sea

      “I have not had food, enough food, for a long time,” Tim Shaddock, 54, said after he and his dog, Bella, were found floating aboard a catamaran, 1,200 miles from land in the Pacific Ocean.

      By MICHAEL LEVENSON

      July 18, 2023
    151. AUSTRALIA DISPATCH

      A Yiddish Haven Thrives in Australia

      Australia has the largest proportion of Holocaust survivors of any country besides Israel. In Melbourne, some of their descendants are leading the way to preserve the Yiddish language.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 18, 2023
    152. Australian State Backs Out of Hosting the 2026 Commonwealth Games

      The state of Victoria cited budget issues in deciding not to stage the multisports competition, originally known as the British Empire Games, raising questions about the event’s fading prestige.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 18, 2023
    153. Modi and India’s Diaspora: A Complex Love Affair Making Global Waves

      Prime Minister Narendra Modi has tried to fuse his image to the economic and political power of Indians abroad. They voice both pride and worry in return.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      July 18, 2023
    154. Mystery Object Is Found on Remote Beach in Western Australia

      The authorities said the cylindrical object, which was found about 155 miles north of Perth, did not pose a risk to the public, but they have yet to identify it.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      July 17, 2023
    155. ON SOCCER

      The Contenders

      As the Women’s World Cup has expanded, so, too, has the group of nations with the firm belief that they can win it.

      By RORY SMITH

      July 17, 2023
    156. Why Every Women’s World Cup City Has Two Names

      A concerted effort to say Indigenous names correctly, and tell the stories behind them, will show up in stadiums in New Zealand and Australia.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 16, 2023
    157. ‘Aldeas para personas con demencia’: una oportunidad para integrar a pacientes y comunidades

      Al aumentar la cantidad de casos de demencia a nivel mundial, una nueva generación de centros de cuidado ofrecen tratamiento integral a las personas con el fin de mantenerlos activos y conectados socialmente.

      By JOANN PLOCKOVA

      July 15, 2023
    158. LETTER 315

      Risk, Regulation and Personal Responsibility in Australia’s Last Frontier

      Setting off fireworks in the Northern Territory, with a sense of time running out.

       
      July 14, 2023
    159. 2,000 Miles, a Balky R.V. and a Swim with Whale Sharks: How We Got Our Travel Mojo Back

      A pandemic-delayed journey to Australia’s Ningaloo Reef helped a family regain its belief in the serendipity of the open road.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      July 12, 2023
    160. LETTER 314

      A High-Profile Australia-English Cricket Series

      More than 150 years ago, an Australian tour to England captured the attention of Britons.

      By NATASHA FROST

      July 7, 2023
    161. Hong Kong Offers Bounties as It Pursues Dissidents Overseas

      The rewards of $128,000 for information leading to the prosecution of dissidents who have fled Hong Kong reflect stepped-up pressure to intimidate activists beyond the reach of the government.

      By TIFFANY MAY

      July 4, 2023
    162. Your Tuesday Briefing: Israel’s Assault on Jenin

      Also, the U.S. Treasury Secretary will visit Beijing.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      July 3, 2023
    163. As Cases Soar, ‘Dementia Villages’ Look Like the Future of Home Care

      A new generation of treatment facilities is aiming to integrate dementia patients with the communities around them, blurring lines between home and hospital.

      By JOANN PLOCKOVA

      July 3, 2023
    164. LETTER 313

      Protecting Australia’s Most Charismatic Murder-Bird

      Cassowaries play a critical role in the Australian ecosystem.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 30, 2023
    165. The Cosmos Is Thrumming With Gravitational Waves, Astronomers Find

      Radio telescopes around the world picked up a telltale hum reverberating across the cosmos, most likely from supermassive black holes merging in the early universe.

      By KATRINA MILLER

      June 28, 2023
    166. LETTER 312

      Tipping Gets ‘More in Your Face,’ and Not Everyone Likes It

      Tipping is not unheard-of in Australia, but an increasing number of apps and payment platforms are actively asking for an extra dollar, or five, on bills.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      June 23, 2023
    167. Where Housing Prices Have Crashed and Billions in Wealth Have Vanished

      In New Zealand, high interest rates have sent property prices sliding nearly 18 percent since November 2021.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 19, 2023
    168. LETTER 311

      Australia’s Opportunities and Challenges on the Path to ‘Net Zero’

      Shipping sunshine? Alan Finkel’s take on the nation’s possible future as a leader in clean energy.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 16, 2023
    169. Test Cricket’s Last Stand

      The Ashes, a century-old rivalry between England and Australia, is the most venerable showcase for a version of cricket that is losing ground to faster, richer rivals.

      By MIKE JAKEMAN

      June 15, 2023
    170. TRILOBITES

      This Extinct Dolphin Had Tusks That Fish Were Wise to Avoid

      The snaggletoothed cetacean used teeth projected from its snout to stun prey, much like modern sawfish do.

      By JACK TAMISIEA

      June 13, 2023
    171. New Zealand’s public broadcaster investigates ‘pro-Kremlin’ changes to some articles.

      A web editor for RNZ has been put on leave and the station has apologized for changes to articles by Reuters and the BBC that had been published on its website.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 13, 2023
    172. Aussie Farmers Unleash Dinosaur Rush as Fossil Findings Rewrite History

      A new understanding of how to search for ancient remains has reinvigorated a region of western Queensland, with tourists flocking to paleontological digs.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      June 11, 2023
    173. Worldwide, Trump’s Latest Legal Woes Draw Outrage, and Shrugs

      Allies and rivals alike, beholding the messiness of America, must calculate the risks and opportunities in the latest plot twist in Donald Trump’s legal troubles.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      June 10, 2023
    174. LETTER 310

      Four Australian Shows and Movies for Your Watchlist

      Love stories, survival reality and stop motion animation: What we’re enjoying.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      June 9, 2023
    175. Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand’s Ex-Leader, Is Now Dame Jacinda Ardern

      Ms. Ardern, who stepped down as prime minister in January, said she had considered declining the title, but accepted it as a way to show gratitude.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 5, 2023
    176. Citing Doubt, Officials Free Woman Convicted in 4 Children’s Deaths in 2003

      An Australian jury found that Kathleen Folbigg had smothered her children. But scientists now say that they probably died from natural causes.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      June 4, 2023
    177. LETTER 309

      Big, Incredible Journeys in an Incredibly Big Country

      Trips across Australia are often necessarily trips at a striking scale.

      By NATASHA FROST

      June 2, 2023
    178. Your Friday Briefing: A Race to Avert a U.S. Default

      Also, a trial stains Australia’s top soldier.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG and JUSTIN PORTER

      June 1, 2023
    179. Australia’s ‘Trial of the Century’ Stains Its Most Decorated Soldier

      A judge ruled for newspapers that had been accused of defaming the soldier by reporting that he had committed war crimes in Afghanistan.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      June 1, 2023
    180. Readers in Asia: What Does L.G.B.T.Q. Life Look Like Where You Live?

      We may include your response in a June edition of the Asia Pacific Morning Briefing.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      May 31, 2023
    181. LETTER 308

      ‘Different Standards’: The Struggle of Indigenous Journalists in Australia

      The departure of the TV host Stan Grant has set off a conversation about race and racism in the country’s media industry.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 26, 2023
    182. Australia Remembered Tina Turner With a Dance

      The Nutbush, set to its eponymous song and sometimes considered an unofficial national dance, is popular with all ages and has taken on special significance after the singer’s death.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 25, 2023
    183. Police Used Excessive Force on 2 Australian Journalists, U.S. Finds

      The Interior Department concluded that U.S. Park Police officers exceeded the “minimum level of reasonable force” during a George Floyd protest in 2020.

      By EMILY STEEL

      May 24, 2023
    184. Rolf Harris, Disgraced British Entertainer, Dies at 93

      His career as a musician and a painter over six decades ended abruptly when he was convicted of sexually abusing teenage girls.

      By EUAN WARD

      May 24, 2023
    185. 95-Year-Old in Australia Dies Days After Police Officer Used Stun Gun on Her

      Hours before Clare Nowland died, the police announced charges against the officer who used the stun gun on her in the care facility where she lived.

      By NATASHA FROST

      May 24, 2023
    186. They Cuddled a Kiwi. New Zealand Said, ‘Stop That.’

      Video of the national bird being handled by Miami zoo visitors caused an outcry in New Zealand. Even the prime minister weighed in.

      By NATASHA FROST

      May 24, 2023
    187. Australia Reckons With TV Host’s Exit Over Racist Abuse

      Stan Grant, an Indigenous journalist, was attacked on social media after talking during coronation coverage about the brutality of colonialism.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 23, 2023
    188. Australia Tries to Break Its Dependence on China for Lithium Mining

      Half of the world’s supply of the critical battery ingredient is mined in Australia, which ships virtually all of it to China. The government and business are betting they can change that.

      By NATASHA FROST and MATTHEW ABBOTT

      May 23, 2023
    189. TIMESVIDEO

      Indigenous TV Host Steps Down Following Online Racist Abuse

      Stan Grant, a journalist and member of the Wiradjuri tribe of Indigenous Australians, called on the news media to reflect on its role during his final address on “Q+A,” a weekly program he hosted.

      By AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

      May 23, 2023
    190. Police in Australia Use Stun Gun on 95-Year-Old Woman

      She was holding a knife, but weighs 95 pounds and uses a walker. The episode, which took place in a care facility, prompted outrage, questions and a police investigation.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 19, 2023
    191. How a Hip Megachurch Became Entangled in Scandal

      A new documentary series explores the history of Hillsong, known for its celebrity congregants and fashionable trappings before being struck by a series of scandals.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      May 19, 2023
    192. LETTER 307

      We Want to Hear From Australia Letter Readers

      What should we be covering? Are there stories that the rest of the world should know about? Let us know.

      By NATASHA FROST

      May 19, 2023
    193. Tsunami Warnings Issued for Pacific Island Nations After Quake

      After a 7.7 magnitude earthquake was recorded, a U.S. agency warned that waves as high as 10 feet could hit Vanuatu. But it later downgraded the estimate, and no major damage was reported.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 19, 2023
    194. Your Thursday Briefing: The G7

      Also, hot years ahead as global temperatures rise.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      May 17, 2023
    195. Biden Says He Is Confident America Will Not Default on Its Debts

      Speaking just moments before he left for a diplomatic trip overseas, President Biden said a default would be “catastrophic.”

      By ZOLAN KANNO-YOUNGS

      May 17, 2023
    196. NEWS ANALYSIS

      Biden Abruptly Cuts Short an Asia-Pacific Visit, to China’s Benefit

      A Pacific island nation had gone to great lengths to host the U.S. president. Now a region is left to wonder again about American steadfastness.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      May 17, 2023
    197. Fire at Hostel in New Zealand’s Capital Kills at Least 6

      Eleven people were still unaccounted for, an official said. The cause of the fire was not yet known.

      By CHARLOTTE GRAHAM-MCLAY

      May 15, 2023
    198. Owen Davidson, Who Won 8 Grand Slams With Billie Jean King, Dies at 79

      In the 1960s and ’70s, he and King dominated mixed doubles tournaments. He was also known for his congeniality, sportsmanship and skill at the net.

      By ALEX TRAUB

      May 14, 2023
    199. ‘A Bit Spooky’: The New Shark Species With Bright, White Eyes

      A newly discovered species of demon catshark is found in the deep waters off Australia.

      By LAUREN MCCARTHY

      May 12, 2023
    200. LETTER 306

      It’s Called Eurovision. So Why Is Australia Part of It?

      Australia has been one of the event’s biggest markets outside Europe. Since 2015, it has been a contestant, but that may end after this year’s final.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 12, 2023
    201. In Australia, He Was a ‘Great Father.’ Secretly, He Was an Escaped Convict.

      New DNA evidence helped confirm that a man who went by John Damon and died in Australia in 2010 was actually William Leslie Arnold, a convicted killer and escaped inmate from Nebraska.

      By JESUS JIMÉNEZ

      May 6, 2023
    202. John Olsen, Last of a Pivotal Group of Australian Artists, Dies at 95

      The last surviving member of a generation that defined his country’s modern art, he painted exuberant landscapes that changed the way Australia saw its environment.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      May 5, 2023
    203. Why So Many Nations in the King’s Realm Want to Say Goodbye

      Whether through a hard break or a soft fade in ties, nations that have kept the British monarch as their head of state are moving toward separation.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      May 5, 2023
    204. LETTER 305

      Australia vs. Warner Bros.?

      The newest A.F.L. team will be in Tasmania. Can the club can be named after the island’s resident marsupial, the Tasmanian devil?

      By NATASHA FROST

      May 5, 2023
    205. Your Friday Briefing: A Coronation Preview

      Also, foreign business fears grow in China.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      May 4, 2023
    206. Serbia Sees Back-to-Back Mass Shootings, a Rarity Outside the U.S.

      Two attacks this week, which left 17 people dead, were the first mass shootings in the country in recent years.

      By JENNY GROSS

      May 3, 2023
    207. Your Wednesday Briefing: A Deep Look at Korean Comfort Women

      Also, Australia’s vape crackdown.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      May 2, 2023
    208. Australia Aims to ‘Stamp Out’ Vaping With Sweeping Regulations

      The proposal would ban all single-use, disposable vapes, halt the importation of nonprescription vapes and restrict certain flavors, colors and ingredients.

      By REMY TUMIN

      May 2, 2023
    209. LETTER 304

      Australia Eyes a Fraught Pivot from Coal Power to Renewables

      As the country’s oldest power station closed, experts warn that the country needs a clearer strategy to manage its exit from coal power.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 28, 2023
    210. ‘Best Friends’ Australia and New Zealand Patch Up a Major Difference

      A reversal in Australian immigration policy toward New Zealand is part of a reset in relations, but some tensions remain.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 27, 2023
    211. Your Tuesday Briefing: China Walks Back Ambassador’s Comments

      Also, Beijing is trying to control chatbots and Thailand prepares for tense elections.

      By AMELIA NIERENBERG

      April 24, 2023
    212. Bruce Haigh, Diplomat Who Helped Battle Apartheid, Dies at 77

      An Australian, he assisted South African dissidents like the journalist Donald Woods, whose story was told in the movie “Cry Freedom.”

      By ALAN COWELL

      April 23, 2023
    213. Barry Humphries (Dame Edna to You, Possums) Is Dead at 89

      Bewigged, bejeweled and bejowled, Mr. Humphries’s creation was one of the longest-lived characters ever channeled by a single performer.

      By MARGALIT FOX

      April 22, 2023
    214. Japanese Ship, Torpedoed in 1942 With P.O.W.s Aboard, Is Found

      When the Montevideo Maru sank in the South China Sea during World War II, it was carrying hundreds of prisoners, most of them Australian.

      By MIKE IVES

      April 22, 2023
    215. LETTER 303

      The Biggest, Darkest Sky in Australia

      Looking for darkness in Australia’s biggest state.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 21, 2023
    216. Lachlan Murdoch Drops Libel Suit Against Australian News Site

      His lawyer said the website, Crikey, intended to exploit the outcome of the Fox-Dominion defamation case in the U.S.

      By KATIE ROBERTSON

      April 20, 2023
    217. Flocking to One of the Few Specks of Land in Sight of a Total Eclipse

      Tens of thousands descended on a tiny town in Western Australia, hundreds of miles from any city, to view a celestial spectacle.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 20, 2023
    218. INSIDE THE BEST-SELLER LIST

      For Kate Morton, a Change of Perspective Changed Everything

      After leaving England and returning to Australia, the best-selling author wrote a novel about a writer who left England and returned to Australia.

      By ELISABETH EGAN

      April 20, 2023
    219. TIMESVIDEO

      Rare Total Eclipse Visible From Australia

      Exmouth in Western Australia was one of very few locations where star gazers could catch this solar eclipse.

      By REUTERS

      April 20, 2023
    220. Contest for Children to Hunt Feral Cats Is Scrapped in New Zealand

      The country aggressively tries to control invasive species, but the culling event, which was to be part of a bigger hunting competition, generated a backlash.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 19, 2023
    221. FIFA Silenced One World Cup Protest but May Face More This Year

      FIFA threatened to suspend men’s captains if they took part in a social justice campaign in Qatar. Will the same rules apply at the Women’s World Cup?

      By TARIQ PANJA

      April 17, 2023
    222. LETTER 302

      Learning to Love My Incomprehensible Kiwi Accent

      It’s surprising how hard it is for New Zealanders to make themselves understood in America.

      By PETE MCKENZIE

      April 14, 2023
    223. TRILOBITES

      New Support for Some Extinct Tasmanian Tiger Sightings

      The last thylacine died in captivity in 1936, but a statistical analysis adds a degree of validity to the survival of small groups of the carnivorous marsupials.

      By JOSHUA RAPP LEARN

      April 7, 2023
    224. LETTER 301

      Who Jacinda Ardern Really Is

      As told in her first and farewell speeches.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 7, 2023
    225. Man Accused of Kidnapping Platypus Is Charged in Australia

      The police had appealed for help after the platypus was spotted at a train station in Queensland. The animal was later released, but the authorities have been unable to find it.

      By MIKE IVES

      April 6, 2023
    226. Keeping an Old Italian Tradition Alive in Australia: ‘Passata Day’

      Two sisters are among the dwindling few who gather family and friends once a year to make a 12-month supply of tomato passata, a purée that is a staple of Italian cuisine.

      By PETER DI SISTO

      April 5, 2023
    227. A Black Man Went to Australia for Gold, Then Stood Up for Democracy

      John Joseph was put on trial for leading a miners’ rebellion seeking less taxation and more representation. His legacy was forgotten — until now.

      By DAMIEN CAVE

      April 5, 2023
    228. TIMESVIDEO

      Jacinda Ardern Delivers Final Speech to New Zealand Parliament

      The former prime minister discussed the legacy she hoped to leave and ended the emotional speech in New Zealand’s Indigenous Maori language.

      By REUTERS

      April 5, 2023
    229. Jacinda Ardern’s Career in New Zealand Politics Ends

      The former prime minister, who is now stepping down from Parliament, urged lawmakers to take action on climate change.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 5, 2023
    230. New Zealand’s Soccer Team Abandons White Shorts, Citing Period Anxiety

      The women’s soccer team said its players would not wear white shorts at the World Cup this summer, acknowledging the concern that some players had expressed about period leaks.

      By AMANDA HOLPUCH

      April 4, 2023
    231. As Temperatures Rise, Melbourne’s Bats Get Their Own Sprinkler System

      On the hottest days, a refreshing mist will cool down flying foxes, which have suffered mass death in Australian heat waves.

      By NATASHA FROST

      April 4, 2023
    232. Hot Cross Buns Are the Pumpkin Spice Latte of Australia

      The warmly spiced Easter bread and the arrival of fall are a match — and mania — made Down Under.

      By DOOSIE MORRIS

      April 3, 2023
    233. Ex-Principal Extradited From Israel Is Convicted of Abuse in Australia

      Malka Leifer, who had led an ultra-Orthodox Jewish girls’ school in Melbourne, was found guilty of sexually abusing students more than 15 years ago.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      April 3, 2023
    234. LETTER 300

      In a Land With No Soccer, Group Hopes to Use It to Score Climate Goals

      The Marshall Islands Soccer Federation aims to draw interest in the sport — and to growing global warming events in the Pacific.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      March 31, 2023
    235. Review: A New Zealand Troupe’s Oceanic Feelings

      Atamira Dance Company’s “Te Wheke” at the Joyce Theater drops you into its world and trusts you can swim in it.

      By BRIAN SEIBERT

      March 30, 2023
    236. An Anxious Asia Arms for a War It Hopes to Prevent

      Doubts about both China and the United States are driving an arms race in the Indo-Pacific with echoes of World War II and new levels of risk.

      By DAMIEN CAVE and CHANG W. LEE

      March 25, 2023
    237. A River Choking on Fish Corpses, and a Community Full of Anger

      It’s the latest clash over a river basin in New South Wales, Australia, in an arid land where social, economic and environmental interests collide over water issues.

      By YAN ZHUANG and MICHAELA SKOVRANOVA

      March 24, 2023
    238. LETTER 299

      Melbourne Art and Design, Past and Present

      Two exhibitions in Melbourne — “Radical Utopia” and “Melbourne Now” — trace the city’s art and design from the 1980s to the present.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 23, 2023
    239. This Passover Egg Dish Always Has a Place at the Table

      But this recipe for egg and onion, from a founder of Australia’s Monday Morning Cooking Club, is delicious any time of year.

      By JOAN NATHAN

      March 23, 2023
    240. TIMESVIDEO

      Australian Prime Minister Gets Emotional Over Referendum

      The Voice to Parliament would enshrine in the Constitution a body to advise the government on Indigenous issues.

      By AUSTRALIAN BROADCAST CORPORATION, VIA REUTERS

      March 23, 2023
    241. Australian State Moves to Ban Nazi Salute After Clashes at Rally

      After neo-Nazis appeared at a protest against transgender rights in Melbourne, a local politician was facing expulsion from her party for taking part in the demonstration.

      By NATASHA FROST

      March 20, 2023
    242. LETTER 298

      Submarine Deal With U.S. and U.K. Sparks Debate in Australia

      The agreement has raised concerns about the need for the costly plan and whether it could tether Australia to the United States.

      By YAN ZHUANG

      March 17, 2023
    243. China Wine Tariff Pushes Australia’s Grape Growers Into Crisis

      Two years later, they’re suffering from a glut of red wine and plummeting grape prices with no overseas market big enough to fill the gap.

      By CLAIRE FU, DAISUKE WAKABAYASHI and ADAM FERGUSON

      March 16, 2023
    244. Seaweed Is Having Its Moment in the Sun

      Seaweed is being reimagined as a plastic substitute, even as cattle feed. But can it thrive in a warming world?

      By SOMINI SENGUPTA and CHANG W. LEE

      March 15, 2023
    245. Cyclone Freddy Brings Mudslides and Floods, Leaving Nearly 200 Dead in Malawi

      The record-breaking storm barreled across southeastern Africa into landlocked Malawi, where rescue workers searched for survivors as rain kept falling.

      By GOLDEN MATONGA and LYNSEY CHUTEL

      March 14, 2023