Gemma O'Doherty tells High Court judge she fears for her safety

https://gemmaodoherty.com/

Gemma O'Doherty

Irish journalist and political candidate

Gemma O’Doherty is a multi award-winning journalist whose work has shone a light on some of the darkest corners of Irish life.

Gemma O'Doherty is an Irish far-right activist and conspiracy theorist. She began her career as a staff writer for the Irish Independent, contributing articles on the criminal justice system and corruption, but was dismissed in 2014 for unethical conduct

File photo - Gemma O'Doherty
Gemma O'Doherty
O’Doherty said she had been abused on the street because of “fake news” published about her.
The Journal

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE

Red Car Speeding Away From Where Mary Boyle Was Last Scene

GEMMA O’DOHERTY HAS told a judge she fears for her safety and has written a substantial document in which she has named names and which will be published in the event of anything happening to her.

“These are dangerous times for journalists like me,” she told Justice Richard Humphreys in the High Court today when she told him her naming document would be released by friends in the event of anything untoward happening.

O’Doherty said she had been abused on the street because of “fake news” published about her but added that some people shook her hand.

“I have been physically assaulted several times in recent months because of my love for this country even while the gardaí looked on. Eggs have been thrown at me,” she said.

She told Judge Humphreys that during an application last week in her absence, on behalf of Fingal County Councillor Jimmy Guerin who is suing her for defamation of character, “outrageous lies” had been made about her and subsequently published in several online and printed media.

“I am not going to have my good name dragged through the mud. I am a journalist whose reputation is impeccable,” she stated in oral submissions to the court.

“In this incredible, spurious and fictional action that has been taken against me I have been the subject of a tsunami of libellous headlines,” she said.

Gemma O'Doherty - Part 1of 3

The Last Video Before Gemma O'Doherty's Wrongful Arrest For Telling The Truth

This could be the last video of Gemma O'Doherty. Gemma believes she will be arrested in the comming days and sent to jail, telling listeners that she is in no way suicidal should God forbid that the authorities try to do anything to Gemma O'Doherty. Also Gemma o'Doherty's website faces wrongful removal from the web. Gemma O'Doherty has been exposing many corruption issues in Ireland, forced nurder inquiries to be reopened and more recently  Gemma O'Doherty has been exposing employees of Beaumount Hospital, Ireland being forced to take the COVID-19 Vaccines against their  will if they want to continue working at the Beaumount Hospital, or any other health care in Ireland.

 

Gemma O'Doherty - Part 2 of 3

The Last Video Before Gemma O'Doherty's Wrongful Arrest For Telling The Truth

Gemma O'Doherty - Part 3of 3

The Last Video Before Gemma O'Doherty's Wrongful Arrest For Telling The Truth

Gemma O'Doherty -

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 1 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 2 of 10

 

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 3 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 4 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 5 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 6 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 7 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 8 of 10

 

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 9 of 10

The Video The Ruling Elite Of Ireland Did Not Want You To See

Whistleblower at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin Part 10 of 10

 

They dont want to be hearing any "adverse reaction" stories ,,, all they,d be wanting is their payment for carrying out the depop programme ... they've no conscience to speak of...

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 1 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 2 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 3 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 4 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

 "....The August 27, 1979 murder of Lord Louis Mountbatten, 79, may have been murdered for some of his paedophile activities ... the truth will eventually come to public light ....  " ... Gemma O'Doherty

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 5 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 6 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Talking About The Madeline McCann Disappearance

"The BBC did not tell the truth about the  Madeline McCann Disappearance case, the most high profile missing child case in the world. The BBC have lied to the public about the  Madeline McCann Disappearance Case - they have lied ... " Gemma O’Doherty

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 7 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

What the Banks have done to the people in Ireland by putting the Irish People in Debt Slavery and the effects of people have been sexually abused when they were young

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 8 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Talks About Sovereignty and the Cabal In Brussels running the EU

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 9 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

Gemma O’Doherty Talking About The Irish Problems and Hope Part 10 of 10

Gemma O’Doherty Challenging State Corruption In Ireland

MARY BOYLE: IRELAND'S LONGEST MISSING PERSON CASE

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE

Red Car Speeding Away From Where Mary Boyle Was Last Scene

Mary Boyle - The Untold Story By Gemma ODoherty Part 1 of  5

A documentary, written and directed by Gemma O'Doherty, about the case of Ireland's youngest missing person. Mary Boyle vanished on her grandparents' remote farm in Donegal in March 1977. She was six years of age. Her remains have never been found. The documentary reveals allegations by retired senior officers that a politician requested the chief suspect not be arrested. He never has been and still lives in Donegal today. Mary Boyle's twin Ann claims that her sister was going to reveal a secret. She says she was murdered to stop her from telling it.

Mary Boyle - The Untold Story By Gemma ODoherty Part 2 of  5

Mary Boyle - The Untold Story By Gemma ODoherty Part 3 of  5

Mary Boyle - The Untold Story By Gemma ODoherty Part 4 of  5

Mary Boyle - The Untold Story By Gemma ODoherty Part 5 of  5

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE - Midweek Mystery-Part 1 of 4

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE - Midweek Mystery-Part 2 of 4

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE - Midweek Mystery-Part 3 of 4

MARY Boyle Irelands Longest Missing Person CASE - Midweek Mystery-Part 4 of 4

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 1 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 2 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 3 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 4 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 5 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 6 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 7 of 10 

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 8 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 9 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -

The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 10 of 10

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults- Full Video

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 1

Gemma Odoherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 2

 

Gemma Odoherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 3

 

 

 

Ireland's Youngest Missing Person -The Disappearance Of Mary Boyle Vanished

Dark Vaults-Part 10 of 10

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 1

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 2

 

Gemma Odoherty and John Waters - Irish Appeal Court of Corrupt - Little Appeal Part 3

 

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters

No Other Court Case Has Effected  Every Irish Person

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters

Most Important Court Case In Ireland

 
 
 

Gemma O'Doherty tells High Court judge she fears for her safety

File photo - Gemma O'Doherty
Gemma O'Doherty
O’Doherty said she had been abused on the street because of “fake news” published about her.

GEMMA O’DOHERTY HAS told a judge she fears for her safety and has written a substantial document in which she has named names and which will be published in the event of anything happening to her.

“These are dangerous times for journalists like me,” she told Justice Richard Humphreys in the High Court today when she told him her naming document would be released by friends in the event of anything untoward happening.

O’Doherty said she had been abused on the street because of “fake news” published about her but added that some people shook her hand.

“I have been physically assaulted several times in recent months because of my love for this country even while the gardaí looked on. Eggs have been thrown at me,” she said.

She told Judge Humphreys that during an application last week in her absence, on behalf of Fingal County Councillor Jimmy Guerin who is suing her for defamation of character, “outrageous lies” had been made about her and subsequently published in several online and printed media.

“I am not going to have my good name dragged through the mud. I am a journalist whose reputation is impeccable,” she stated in oral submissions to the court.

“In this incredible, spurious and fictional action that has been taken against me I have been the subject of a tsunami of libellous headlines,” she said.

O’Doherty said she would be suing every single news medium that had carried articles and printed “the most outrageous lies and scurrilous defamation of me”.

She told Judge Humphreys that her appearance in court was her opportunity to set the record straight.

She said the alleged defamation on her Twitter and Facebook account and the substantive action by Guerin, a brother of murdered journalist Veronica Guerin, was an attempt to silence her. She has made allegations that gardaí colluded with criminals in Veronica Guerin’s murder and asked Judge Humphreys to strike it out.

“I am asking you to strike out this spurious action now. It’s a waste of court time and taxpayers money,” she said.

Publicity and media headlines appeared after the High Court had been told last Monday week that O’Doherty had been “actively trying to evade” service of the defamation proceedings brought against her by Guerin. She denied the allegation in court and said Guerin would be unable to prove it.

Details of the alleged defamation against Guerin by O’Doherty has not been detailed to the court.

O’Doherty said the gardaí had framed people in the past and when one was taking on the elements of the State, as she was, about corruption the State would stop at nothing to silence her.

Barrister Ronan Lupton, who appeared for Guerin with solicitors Flynn O’Driscoll, told the court he strongly objected to allegations O’Doherty had made against Guerin’s legal team.

Judge Humphreys said he would not strike out orders that had already been made against O’Doherty and awarded costs against her. The court did not accept the allegations she had made against Guerin’s legal team.

Comments are closed as legal proceedings are ongoing.

 

O'Doherty compares Covid-19 restrictions to living in 'Nazi Germany' at High Court hearing

https://www.thejournal.ie/four-courts-gemma-odoherty-john-waters-court-restrictions-gardai-5091535-May2020/

May 5th 2020, 6:29 PM

JOHN WATERS AND Gemma O’Doherty have told the High Court that laws introduced by the State due to the Covid-19 pandemic are “unprecedented” and amount to an “effective suspension” of every citizen’s constitutional rights.

In judicial review proceedings against the State and the Minister for Health, Waters and O’Doherty seek to have various pieces of recently enacted legislation, which they say are unconstitutional and flawed, quashed by a judge of the High Court.

In her submission to the court, O’Doherty said the restrictions are comparable to living in “Nazi Germany”. 

The High Court has directed that their application for permission to bring their challenge be heard in the presence of the respondents.

Both the State and lawyers representing the Dáil, Seanad and the Ceann Comhairle, which are notice parties to the proceedings, claim the court should not allow them bring the challenge and that the case should be dismissed.

The preliminary application to determine if permission should be granted is before Mr Justice Charles Meenan.

In their submissions to the court, Waters and O’Doherty said the laws that have been introduced, and the manner in which they have been enacted, are repugnant to several articles of the constitution including rights to travel, bodily integrity and the family.

Waters said the issues that he and O’Doherty are raising are hugely important for all citizens. He said the laws brought in response to the Covid-19 pandemic amount to a suspension of constitutional rights.

The laws, he said, keep people in their homes, and have resulted in the closure of parks and beeches.

Waters said he agreed with comments by former British Supreme Court judge Lord Sumption who described the restrictions in place in the UK, which Waters said are similar to the ones in Ireland, as being worse that than what was imposed in the UK during World War II.

Referring to the economic impact of the restrictions, he said he feared that the country could find itself back in the place it was in 1929 when the Wall Street Crash sent the would into an economic depression.

Waters also told the court that he and O’Doherty do not accept the accuracy of the number of deaths in the State attributable to Covid-19, due to the manner in which such deaths are being officially recorded.

‘Nazi Germany’

O’Doherty, who told the court she is an award-winning journalist who has done a lot of work covering health issues, said the legislation had given powers allowing the gardaí to harass people when they go out and about and have kept citizens under mass house arrest.

During her submissions to the court, she compared the restrictions to living “in Nazi Germany” where people were required to carry papers with them at all times.

This, she said, was detrimental to people’s health including that by being kept indoors they were not getting enough Vitamin D.

She also told the court that the State basis for introducing the laws are “scientifically fraudulent” and evidence to that effect would be submitted at the full hearing of their action.

 

 

 

Waters also told the court that the case more than satisfied the legal threshold required by the court to allow the challenge proceed to a full hearing.

Both he and O’Doherty also have the legal standing to bring the case as they have been personally affected by the laws challenged, he submitted.

In their action, O’Doherty and Waters have challenged legislation including the 2020 Health Preservation and Protection and Other Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act, the 2020 Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act Covid-19 Act, and the 1947 Health Act (Affected Areas) Order.

Their proceedings are also aimed at striking down temporary restriction regulations brought due to Covid-19 under the 1947 Health Act.

The State, represented by Patrick McCann SC, appearing with Gerard Meehan BL, opposes the application for leave, saying the claims are not arguable.

The Dáil, the Seanad and the Ceann Comhairle, which have been added as notice parties to the action because part of the challenge concerns how the laws were enacted, represented by Francis Kieran Bl, are also opposed to leave being granted.

Supporters 

As was the case when the matter was before the court last week, there was tight security and a large garda presence around the Four Courts complex.

A crowd of supporters gathered outside the Four Courts to cheer and applaud O’Doherty and Waters as they arrived and left. Some people held placards protesting the government restrictions, while others waved tricolours.

Only a limited number of people were allowed into the court due to social distancing conditions imposed by the Courts Service.

 

 
Source: Dominic McGrath/Twitter

 

Last week, a similarly-sized crowd gathered to support the judicial review action. 

Chancery Place was again closed to members of the public and there was a large garda presence in the area.

Supporters of O’Doherty and Waters today once again remained outside the Four Courts building and were not allowed past barriers erected by gardaí.

Gardaí did not seek to disperse the crowd, which waited outside for the duration of the hearing.

Both O’Doherty and Waters addressed the crowd before and after the hearing.

The hearing will continue tomorrow.

With reporting from Dominic McGrath. Comments are closed due to ongoing legal proceedings.

 

 

Gemma O'Doherty calls garda 'gangster' before she is arrested in viral video

The right-wing anti-masker was quizzed by gardai after challenging officers live on her stream, but has since been released

https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/gemma-odoherty-arrest-video-garda-22596074

Conspiracy queen and anti-lockdown leader Gemma O’Doherty has been released after she was arrested for refusing to give her name and address to the gardai.

O'Doherty was arrested earlier today after calling a garda a “gangster” while broadcasting the incident live to thousands of followers on her website, Dublin Live reports.

The right-wing anti-masker was quizzed by gardai after challenging officers who were removing a banner from a flyover spanning one of the busiest roads out of Dublin at rush hour today.

The Dubliner was held at Bray Garda Station after she live-streamed a row with officers, where she calling one a “gangster” as he took down a massive sign that had been bound to a footbridge over the N11 near Kilmacanogue, Co Wicklow.

In the now viral video, the controversial campaigner can be heard saying: "Look at this! Look at this! This is criminal damage."

Pointing her camera at one of the gardai, she said: "How dare you. Look at this. This is a gangster."

The former Irish Independent reporter then asks one of the guards for his ID number before claiming what he was doing was "criminal damage”.

There were two banners over the busy road, one which read “Masks spread germs”, the other screamed: “No forced vaccines.”

Her own footage also shows her accuse the pair of being "cowards and traitors to the Irish people".

The Garda then asks her for her details, leading Ms O'Doherty to respond: "You won't be getting my name and address", before she turns to walk away.

 

Gemma O'Doherty arriving at the Disclosures Tribunal in Dublin Castle, Dublin (Image: Stephen Collins / Collins Photos)

Gemma O'Doherty arrested after refusing to give name and address to gardai live on stream

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters facing huge bill as High Court rules they must pay legal costs

 

High Court orders Gemma O'Doherty to take down defamatory videos

Gemma O’Doherty says hospital’s action against her over videos ‘spurious’

 

Beaumont seeks injunction requiring removal of allegedly defamatory internet videos

 Gemma O’Doherty and John Waters arriving at the Four Courts in Dublin on Friday. Photograph: Collins Courts
Gemma O’Doherty and John Waters arriving at the Four Courts in Dublin on Friday. Photograph: Collins Courts
Aodhan O'Faolain  Fri, Jun 18, 2021
 

Activist Gemma O’Doherty has opposed what she says is a “spurious and outrageous” application by Dublin’s Beaumont hospital for an injunction requiring her to remove allegedly defamatory internet videos.

Seeking the High Court injunction, both the hospital and its Director of Nursing Marie Murray claim the videos contain allegations that staff are being “forced” to take “experimental Covid-19 injections” which, the defendant alleges, have killed thousands of people.

The plaintiffs also claim that in the videos Ms O’Doherty describes the hospital as “a death camp,” and makes other claims that are untrue and clearly defamatory.

They are seeking injunctions, under the Defamation Act 2009, in the context of defamation proceedings, to have the videos removed and to prevent any re-publication of them.

The plaintiffs contend Ms O’Doherty has no defence with any reasonable prospect of success, and that the injunctions should remain in place pending the outcome of the full hearing of the dispute.

At the High Court on Friday, Ms O’Doherty said she would “not be silenced” over what she told Mr Justice Senan Allen over what she said was one of the biggest scandals in the history of the State. She said she stands over what she said in the videos.

Following the conclusion of submissions from both sides in the action, Mr Justice Allen said he was reserving his decision, and would deliver judgment as soon as possible.

‘Waste of public money’

In her submissions, Ms O’Doherty said the hospital’s action against her was “spurious” and “outrageous” “a waste of public money” and that she “should not be here” as she was busy working on stories for a new newspaper.

People at the hospital she said were being forced to take an experimental vaccine, which had killed 14,000 people in Europe, she claimed.

She said the Covid-19 vaccines are unsafe and that what she was saying was not her own view or something she has made up, but is based on scientific facts.

She said she is a journalist was reporting on what was happening to staff at the hospital, which she said was her main concern, and that she “would not be silenced.”

She said was still receiving a “tsunami” of information from people including staff at the hospital, who she described as whistle-blowers whose “testimonies need to be heard”.

Ms O’Doherty, who was accompanied in court by John Waters, said the claims against her were “lies”, that others were lying, and that she was “telling the truth”.

Urging the court not to grant the injunction, she said Beaumont did not have reputation to damage. She told the court she had a very negative personal experience at the hospital with a loved one, and described it as a “kip”.

Eoin McCullough SC, appearing with Michael Binchy BL for the plaintiffs, said his side was anxious to have the orders put in place.

While his clients did not agree with Ms O’Doherty, she was perfectly entitled to take the views she has in relation to vaccines and in particular vaccines associated with the pandemic.

‘Death camp’

However, the case was not about her views on vaccines or Covid-19,he said.

Counsel said his clients had issues with comments made in the videos made by Ms O’Doherty, including where she described the hospital as a “death camp” and some named staff as “psychopaths”.

Ms O’Doherty had further alleged that management, senior consultants, nurses, doctors and everyone involved in providing the vaccine have “blood on their hands”.

It was also falsely alleged staff are being forced to get the Covid-19 vaccine and, if they did not, they would be demoted to clerical duties, ostracised, harassed and stalked, he said.

The comments, he said, are not true and Ms O’ Doherty had not disclosed any defence to plaintiff’s allegations in her submissions to the court.

Counsel said that all vaccinations are undertaken on a voluntary and consented basis in line with HSE policy with the consent process including provision information from independent experts.

Counsel said that in line with HSE policy, any member of hospital staff who decided not to take a vaccine would not have a “face to face role with patients, counsel said.

There was no question of staff being stalked or treated in the manner alleged by the defendant in the videos, counsel added.

Brother of Veronica Guerin takes defamation action against Gemma O'Doherty

O'Doherty ran as a candidate in the European elections this year.
O'Doherty ran as a candidate in the European elections this year.
 
Sep 11th 2019,

THE BROTHER OF murdered journalist Veronica Guerin has launched court proceedings against former Irish Independent journalist Gemma O’Doherty.

Court papers for the case, issued by Jimmy Guerin who is an independent Fingal county councillor, were filed in the High Court on Monday. 

It is understood Guerin is alleging that O’Doherty publicly linked him to criminal court proceedings in social media posts earlier this year, but he had no part in this criminal case.

O’Doherty attempted to run in last year’s presidential election, but was unable to secure enough nominations from local councils to get on the ballot.

She also ran in the European elections this year in the Dublin constituency, where she finished 12th out of 19 candidates. 

Speaking to TheJournal.ie yesterday, Gemma O’Doherty claimed she was also suing Jimmy Guerin for alleged defamation. Court papers were filed for her proceedings yesterday.

Estate of deceased councillor allowed to continue defamation case against journalist Gemma O'Doherty

The matter arises from O’Doherty’s documentary about the unsolved disappearance of Mary Boyle in 1977.
Mar 27th 2019
 

THE ESTATE OF Donegal councillor and hotelier Sean McEniff, who died two years ago, was substituted yesterday as plaintiff in a defamation claim McEniff had launched against campaigning journalist Gemma O’Doherty.

Eamon McArdle, an accountant who is acting as executor for McEniff’s estate, was allowed today by Judge Jacqueline Linnane to continue the defamation proceedings on behalf of the estate which can sue for damages of €75,000.

McArdle’s application had been made before Judge Linnane earlier this month and the judge had adjourned it to allow for further affidavits to be lodged in the case. 

Today she granted McArdle leave to continue the case on behalf of the estate despite opposition from O’Doherty’s legal team.

The matter, which arises from a documentary, Mary Boyle: The Untold Story, about the mysterious unsolved disappearance of the child in 1977, will now go to a full trial. The video was posted by O’Doherty on YouTube where it has been viewed almost 800,000 times.

It claimed a politician had in effect prevented gardaí from pursuing a particular suspect into the disappearance of the six-year-old, alleging the unidentified politician had made  “a phone call”.

Widespread speculation 

McEniff issued statements five years ago stating that he could not have been the politician referred to in the documentary “by rumour and innuendo” surrounding the allegation. He had denied having any knowledge of the phone call involved.

He issued legal proceedings against O’Doherty in 2016, shortly before his death, and while a libel action would previously have died with the plaintiff, the 2009 Defamation Act allowed for the estate of a deceased person to apply to continue the case. 

Although no particular politician was named on the documentary there has been widespread speculation in South Donegal that McEniff was the politician it claimed made a call to a senior garda which allegedly resulted in the main suspect not being arrested in the disappearance of Mary near her grandparents home at Cashelard, Ballyshannon, 42 years ago.

A garda cold case has been keeping the case under review. A date will now be set by the Circuit Court for a hearing of the case.

Comments have been closed as the above case is before the courts. 

 

State to oppose 'quite substantial' challenge against Covid-19 laws by Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters

O’Doherty argued that Irish people should be allowed to go outside and “build up a herd immunity.”
 
Apr 21st 2020

THE STATE IS to oppose a High Court challenge brought by John Waters and Gemma O’Doherty against laws introduced by the State arising out of the Covid-19 pandemic.

They claim that the laws are flawed and unconstitutional and want them struck down.

In judicial review proceedings against the State and the Minister for Health, they seek to have various pieces or recently enacted legislation declared null and void by a judge of the High Court.

The legislation challenged includes the 2020 Health Preservation and Protection and Other Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act, the 2020 Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act Covid-19 Act, The 1947 Health Act (Affected Areas) Order.

Their proceedings are also aimed at striking down temporary restriction regulations brought due to Covid-19 under the 1947 Health Act.

The action against what they claim are laws is against The Minister for Health, Ireland and the Attorney General.

Last week the High Court directed that the pair’s application for permission to bring the challenge be heard on notice to the state parties.

The matter was listed for mention before Ms Justice Deirdre Murphy this morning.

Gerard Meehan Bl for the State told the court it will oppose the application for leave to bring the challenge.

Counsel asked the court to adjourn the case for two weeks to prepare a sworn statement in response to what is a “quite substantial” challenge.

 

 

 

In the current climate, counsel said while the State has been working on its response things were taking longer to get done, particularly when trying to work with persons in the Department of Health.

Counsel also told the court given that part of the challenge concerns how the laws in question were enacted the Dáil, the Seanad and the Ceann Comhairle would have to be added to the proceedings as notice parties.

Counsel said that as well as hearing from the notice parties, legal submissions might also be required as part of the leave application.

In light of that, counsel asked that the matter be listed for mention in two weeks time.

The applicants, while not objecting to the addition of the notice parties, expressed strong concerns about the state’s application regarding the adjournment and said the leave application needs to be heard as soon as possible.

Waters told the court that the state parties were attempting to “filibuster”, “procrastinate” and delay what he said is a very important matter.

Outlining the nature of the action O’Doherty said what was happening regarding the lockdown was “outrageous”.

She said people were being held under mass house arrest, or fear being interrogated by the gardaí if they leave their homes.

People, she said, should be allowed go about their business and that normal life must be allowed to resume.

The vast majority of people are unaffected by Covid-19, which she said was “no threat to life”, and that the Irish people should be allowed to go outside and “build up a herd immunity.”

O’Doherty added that expert medical evidence supporting her claims will be presented to the court as part of the case.

Ms Justice Murphy told O’Doherty that the court was not considering what were substantial arguments in the action, but was making directions with a view to getting the application heard.

The judge said that she accepted that the leave application raised issues that needed to be heard. The judge said that the leave hearing should be heard in two weeks time but adjourned the matter for a week, when it is to be mentioned before the court to see how the parties are getting on.

Earlier, both the applicants questioned if the proceedings were being held in public.

Up to 100 supporters of the two gathered in the Round Hall of the Four Court’s but were not permitted to enter court due to social distancing guidelines introduced by the Chief Justice and the Presidents of the Courts arising out of the Covid-19 pandemic.

An application to let some or all of those persons into the courtroom was dismissed by the Judge.

The judge said the case was being heard in public and was being reported on by the media.

The judge said that not everyone could fit into a courtroom, and wondered if a larger than capacity group wished to attend a hearing should the court be moved to the “National Convention Centre”.

The applicants expressed their dissatisfaction over the court’s decision.

The judge said that a Digital Audio Recording of today proceedings should be made available to the applicants.

Comments as disabled as legal proceedings are ongoing

Gemma O'Doherty denies trying to evade service of defamation proceedings against her by Jimmy Guerin

 
 
File photo - Gemma O'Doherty
 Gemma O'Doherty
In his action, Guerin claims he was defamed in comments allegedly posted by O’Doherty about him on social media.
 
Aug 18th 2020, 
 
ACTIVIST GEMMA O’DOHERTY has denied claims she tried to evade service of defamation proceedings brought against her by Jimmy Guerin, the brother of murdered journalist Veronica Guerin.

Today, O’Doherty told Justice Richard Humphreys that defamation proceedings against her are vexatious and an “outrageous attempt” to silence her from revealing corruption, which she said “will not happen”.

She also told the court that the publication of her purported home address in media reports of court proceedings where it was alleged she was trying to evade service had endangered her privacy and her safety.

Representing herself, O’Doherty said she is a “well respected” and “a multi award-winning journalist” journalist with over “two million followers”.  

However, she said has “received death threats” and “assaulted” due to her work as an investigative reporter, and expressed her concern that ‘Antifa’ may try to harm her. 

She also said that she had to take extra security precautions at the address, which cannot be published due to an order of the court.

 

 

 

In his action, Guerin, who is an independent councillor on Fingal County Council, claims he was defamed in comments allegedly posted by O’Doherty about him on her Facebook and Twitter accounts in July 2019.

He seeks damages, including aggravated and punitive damages, as well as injunctions permanently prohibiting the continued publication of the comments at the centre of the action.

The Howth-based councillor further seeks an order restraining O’Doherty from publishing similar statements about him in the future.  

Last week, following an ex-parte application, Guerin’s lawyers secured various orders against O’Doherty, including one deeming that she has been formally served with the summons outlining the action against her. 

In their application, Guerin’s lawyers claimed O’Doherty had been “actively trying to evade service,” of the proceedings she said were brought against her in order to stop her speaking out about Garda involvement in the murder of Veronica Guerin and the protection of paedophiles by the gardaí.

Today, O’Doherty said the claim she had tried to evade service, of documents she said she had already been served, was “utterly untrue”.

On an ex-parte basis, she sought various orders varying the orders made last week. The orders she seeks include one directing the service of any documents on her to an alternative address in Dublin or by email.

She sought orders preventing media publication of her purported home address. She also intends to have Guerin’s action against her struck out.

During her submissions, O’Doherty was critical of the media reporting of last week’s application, which she said was “derogatory, defamatory and vicious”. 

O’Doherty claimed the judge who heard the case last week, Justice Deirdre Murphy erred by granting the orders.

She was further critical of both Guerin and his legal team, and made allegations that the court had been misled and that perjury had been committed, and a complaint has been made to the gardaí. 

Justice Humphreys said he was prepared to make orders preventing the media publishing her home address. 

However, he was not prepared to grant her any further orders in the absence of other side, and adjourned the matter to tomorrow’s sitting of the court.

O’Doherty however objected to the matter being adjourned. She said the order she sought should be granted as the other side had obtained orders against her when she was not in court.

In reply the judge said the matter would have to be heard in the presence of both sides. While O’Doherty might not like it “that is how the law works”, the Judge said.

 

 Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters must pay legal costs of failed appeal, Court of Appeal rules.

https://www.thejournal.ie/gemma-odoherty-court-of-appeal-5425140-Apr2021/

 

Gemma O'Doherty and John Waters Court of Appeal Case-20th Jan.2021-Remarkable Claims About Covid-19

 

The IRA Assassination of Lord Mountbatten: Facts and Fallout The murder of the British royal and World War II hero signaled a dark period ahead for relations between England and Northern Ireland.

LESLEY KENNEDY 

UPDATED:DEC 22, 2020ORIGINAL:NOV 13, 2020 
 

https://www.history.com/news/mountbatten-assassination-ira-thatcher

The gruesome 1979 IRA assassination of a beloved British royal—which took place the same day as a deadly coordinated attack on British troops—led to outrage, heartbreak and a heightening of “The Troubles,” the decades-long Northern Ireland conflict.

The Provisional Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for the August 27, 1979 murder of Lord Louis Mountbatten, 79, Earl of Burma, great-grandson of Queen Victoria, second cousin of Queen Elizabeth II and great-uncle of Prince Charles. The World War II hero and last viceroy of India was aboard his 29-foot Shadow V fishing boat with six others near his summer home in northwest Ireland the morning of the attack.

A Sunny Day Turns Grim

IRA assassination of Lord Mountbatten, Shadow V
 

 

 

Part of the wreckage of Lord Mountbatten's boat the Shadow V after it had been bombed by the IRA in August 1979.

Independent News and Media/Getty Images

August 27, 1979, a Bank holiday, had dawned sunny, following days of rain. “Dickie” Mountbatten and some of his family who had been staying at their holiday home, Classibawn Castle near the Village of Cliffoney, County Sligo in the Republic of Ireland, decided to take an outing on their boat to take in the good weather.

Fifteen minutes after setting sail, a planted bomb was activated by two members of the Provisional IRA, a paramilitary group of Irish nationalists who waged a terror campaign to drive British forces from Northern Ireland to create a united, independent nation. Known as "the Troubles," the conflict raged for 25 years before IRA and loyalist ceasefires were initiated. By 1998, the year the Good Friday or Belfast Agreement settled the conflict, more than 3,600 people had died.

“The boat was there one minute and the next minute it was like a lot of matchsticks floating on the water,” a witness told the New York Times.

The party of seven aboard the Shadow included Mountbatten, his daughter Patricia, her husband, Lord John Brabourne, their 14-year-old twins, Timothy and Nicholas, and Lord Brabourne’s mother, the dowager Lady Doreen Brabourne. Paul Maxwell, 15, a friend of the family who worked on the boat, was also on board. Mountbatten, Nicholas Brabourne and Maxwell were killed immediately. Lady Brabourne died the next day and the others survived serious injuries.

“Fifty pounds of gelignite exploded, sending showers of timber, metal, cushions, lifejackets and shoes into the air,” Andrew Lownie, author of The Mountbattens: Their Lives and Loveswrote for the BBC. “Then, there was a deadly silence.”

But the explosion wasn’t the only carnage that day. Later that afternoon, 18 British soldiers were killed near the Irish border at Warrenpoint in an IRA bombing ambush. “It was the single heaviest death toll for the British Army in the 10 years since it was sent in to quell fighting between Roman Catholic and Protestant militants,” according to the Times.

Mountbatten, Mentor to Prince Charles, Was an Easy Target

Mountbatten was both a sentimental and symbolic target. “He was one of the most respected members of the royal family and was serving as mentor to Prince Charles,” says Jeffrey Lewis, lecturer in the International Studies Program at Ohio State University.

Mountbatten was also an easy target. The bomb had been placed in his unguarded boat the night before his murder. He had been vacationing in the Irish town of Mullaghmore throughout the 1970s and had refused security detail, despite repeated threats from the Provisional IRA to assassinate him. Mountbatten had declared, “Who the hell would want to kill an old man anyway?”

Brendan O’Leary, a political science professor at the University of Pennsylvania and author of A Treatise on Northern Ireland, notes that while Mountbatten could not have predicted the IRA would plant and trigger a bomb on his boat, he had been lax about his own security.

“He had been supreme allied commander in southeast Asia, and was said to have been the youngest admiral in the history of the Navy,” he says. “He was also known as the last viceroy of India, who had overseen its partition. He was therefore a very prominent public figure, but a retired man of 79, who played no role in the British security forces in Northern Ireland, and who regularly holidayed in Ireland, could not be described as a legitimate war target.”

Timothy White, a political science professor at Xavier University who teaches courses on Irish culture and politics, adds that by assassinating one of the most beloved members of the royal family, the IRA hoped to convince the British to leave Northern Ireland and allow Northern Ireland to join the Irish republic.

“By killing such a high-profile and public figure, the IRA wanted everyone in England to feel scared of the potential of the IRA to terrorize the British population,” he says.

A statement from the Provisional IRA claimed immediate responsibility for Mountbatten’s “execution,” calling it “a discriminate act to bring to the attention of the English people the continuing occupation of our country. … The death of Lord Mountbatten and tributes paid to him will be seen in contrast to the apathy of the British Government and English people to the deaths of over 300 British soldiers and the deaths of Irish men, women and children at the hands of their forces.”

Provisional IRA bombmaker Thomas McMahon, 31, was found guilty of the Mountbatten attack and was sentenced to life. IRA activist Francis McGirl, 24, was acquitted. McMahon was released from prison after serving 19 years as part of the Good Friday Agreement.

READ MORE: How Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland Became a Part of the U.K.

Fear and Outrage

Lord Mountbatten Funeral, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Prince Charles, IRA assassination
 
 The coffin of Lord Mountbatten at the Westminster Abbey State funeral as members of the Royal Family, (left-right) Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Prince Charles, look on.
 

The August 27 attacks lead to widespread fear and outrage in the region, according to Lewis.

“The indiscriminate nature of the attack led many to condemn the IRA as savage and cowardly,” he says. “At the same time, the sophistication of the bomb—it was detonated by radio remote control—coupled with the Warrenpoint ambush suggested that the IRA was becoming more dangerous and capable. This combination—savagery coupled with tactical competence—was very unsettling.”

Among the English, the reaction in Parliament, newspapers and newscasts, was outrage. O’Leary, who grew up in Northern Ireland and Sudan, points out that Mountbatten had been a war hero and important mentor to Prince Charles. His killing and that of his grandchild and his daughter’s mother-in-law ”were regarded as especially outrageous.” In Ireland, he adds, there was outrage that a guest had been killed, as well as children and a woman who had no public or security force connections.

Ulster Unionists called for increased security, and called the Republic of Ireland a safe haven for terrorists—in fact, the Irish police were able to identify and convict the organizer of the bombing of Mountbatten’s boat with forensic evidence,” O’Leary says. He adds that among those who were sympathetic to the IRA’s causes, more supported the attack of soldiers from the Parachute Regiment, which had been behind the massacre of civilians on Bloody Sunday in January 1972, than the murder of an elderly, retired grandfather and his family.

Margaret Thatcher, elected prime minister just before the assassination, saw the IRA as a criminal, rather than political, organization. She responded by withdrawing political rights associated with prisoner of war status for IRA prisoners. The IRA responded in turn with a hunger strike. The leader of the hunger strike, Irish nationalist Bobby Sands, was then elected to British Parliament but would die in prison from his hunger strike on May 5, 1981. Ultimately, White says, the murder of Mountbatten and his family signaled a raw, dark period ahead for England and Northern Ireland. 

Mountbatten, Mentor to Prince Charles, Was an Easy Target

Lord Mountbatten

Lord Louis Mountbatten reviews cadets at the Metropolitan Police College in London, April 2, 1969. 

Irish Republican Army: Timeline HISTORY.COM EDITORS

Irish Republican Army: Timeline HISTORY.COM EDITOR
   UPDATED:NOV 13, 2020ORIGINAL:MAY 15, 2019   
https://www.history.com/topics/21st-century/irish-republican-army
 
Established in 1919 to halt British rule in Northern Ireland using armed forces, the Irish Republican Army, or IRA, fought for independence and a reunified republic—often in tandem with, but independent of, the Irish nationalist party, Sinn Fein.

CONTENTS

  1. Bloody Sunday Leads to New IRA Recruits; Lord Mountbatten Is Assassinated 
  2. Hunger Strikes Leave 10 Dead
  3. British Soldiers Beaten, Shot Dead at Funeral
  1. In 1969, demanding British withdrawal from Northern Ireland but differing on tactics, the IRA split into two factions: officials and provisionals. Officials sought independence through peace, while the provisionals used violence to further its efforts, which resulted in an estimated 1,800 deaths, including more than 600 civilians. As the Provisional IRA and other paramilitary groups waged an increasingly violent campaign and the British Army retaliated, the period known as the "Troubles" roiled the region and beyond for nearly 30 years. 

    Below is a timeline of notable events.

  2. Bloody Sunday Leads to New IRA Recruits; Lord Mountbatten Is Assassinated 

  3. Dec. 28, 1969: Aiming to protect the Catholic minority from discrimination from loyalist militants and the Protestant-Majority police force, the Provisional Army Council, officially splinters off from the IRA. The Provisional IRA soon becomes known as simply the IRA, while the other faction, known as the Original IRA, quickly diminishes in stature.

     
  4. Jan. 30, 1972: Known as Bloody Sunday, 13 unarmed Catholic civil rights demonstrators are killed, with 15 wounded, by British paratroopers during a civil rights march in Derry in Northern Ireland. The British Army falsely called the victims gunmen and bombers—a report finalized in 2010 found none of the dead were threats. The shooting lead hundreds to join the IRA.

  5. July 7, 1972: Unsuccessful secret peace talks take place between the IRA and British government in Chelsea’s Cheyne Walk, the first meeting of the two groups since 1921.

  6. July 21, 1972: Twenty-plus IRA bombs explode in Belfast, leaving nine dead and 130 injured on what will come to be called Bloody Friday. The British retaliate 10 days later, with Operation Motorman, bringing in tanks to enter “no-go” areas controlled by the IRA in Derry and West Belfast.

  7. Nov. 21, 1974: Targeting two pubs in Birmingham, England known to be popular among off-duty law enforcement, the IRA sets off bombs that kill 21 and injure 182. This marks the deadliest year of the long-running conflict, with nearly 500 casualties, more than half of them civilians.

  8. Aug. 27, 1979: An IRA bomb kills four, including a cousin of Queen Elizabeth IILord Mountbatten.